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FAQ

Trex® Frequently Asked Questions

General Information and Product Features

What is in Trex composite fencing?

Trex composite fencing is a combination of materials, primarily plastics and wood. The thermoplastic content (a type of plastic polymer that can be melted down and recycled almost indefinitely) is primarily polyethylene from reclaimed/recycled grocery bags and stretch film. The wood fiber is typically obtained from furniture makers and/or waste pallets, and is a mix of hardwood and softwood sawdust. The recycled/reclaimed portion of the product makes up approximately 95% of the material with roughly half of that content in plastic and the other half in wood. The remaining 5% is a combination of pigmentation and adhesives (proprietary glues to bind the wood and plastic).  The finished product is a decay-resistant, durable material that are extruded to create the profiles that make up a Trex fence.

FAQ 1

What happens if a golf ball hits a Trex fence?

Trex Fencing can handle the wear and tear of every day use better than most other vinyl or wood fences. In many cases, a golf ball would not leave any mark large enough to be noticeable. But, if traveling fast enough, it could leave an abrasion of some kind.

FAQ 2In the case of scuffs and abrasions, Trex Fencing offers a unique advantage over other fencing materials. Trex Fencing is dyed from the inside out during the manufacturing process, which mean the color of the material is the same throughout. When scuffs occur, the revealed coloring will eventually weather and blend in with the rest of the material, making scuffs much less visible over time. This is a great benefit over other material, especially vinyl, because scuffs and dents can quickly become eyesores if they are big enough.

FAQ 3

FAQ 4

How long does a wood fence last?

The average life of a wood fence is anywhere around 10-15 years. It is important to remember, though, that a wood fence requires a lot in both time and money to keep it maintained. In order to get the most life out of your wood fence, you will need to repaint, restain, and make necessary repairs about every 3-5 years.

Where is Trex Fencing shipped from?

Trex Fencing is shipped out of our distributing facility here in the mountains of Provo, Utah. We coordinate with shipping companies to send out orders all the way from California to Maine, and can usually get orders to our customers anywhere from 2-6 business days once it leaves our facility.

FAQ 5

FAQ 6Our distributing facility works to get orders out of our facility with 10 business days, which means our total lead time to get you your order is around 2-3 weeks under typical circumstances. Call our team at 877-700-8739 for more information regarding current lead times and shipping information.

What type of fencing is best for dogs?

The type of fencing that is best for dogs depends on what you are trying to accomplish. If you are wanting to keep your dog from harassing a passerby, then you may want to consider a full-privacy fence. If you are worried about your dog tearing up your fence, then you will want something durable. Fortunately, Trex’s full privacy composite fence system is a durable and beautiful alternative to wood or vinyl. Feel free to check out The Virtues & Benefits of Trex Fencing to see if it is the right fit for you.

FAQ 7

Who gets the nice side of the fence?

Trex is a true neighbor-friendly fence. Both the customer and the neighbor get the nice side of the fence.

When one person puts up a fence, it actually becomes a fence (sometimes indirectly) for others and it can be hard to ensure that everyone is happy. With traditional wood-style fences, the two sides are usually different in appearance; one side showcasing the front of the pickets and trim rails, if applicable. The other side reveals the supporting cross-rails and, in some cases, metal posts and inserts that consist of the framing. This is usually deemed the “ugly side” as it offers considerably less aesthetic appeal. Most of the time, customers elect to have the ugly side facing inward towards their property so the outward look of their property is attractive. In some cases, the ugly side will be turned away from the homeowner’s property, and will instead be facing a neighbor’s property, creating an unfortunate situation for the neighbor.

Trex Fencing is developed with a unique simulated board-on-board design that enables a configuration giving both sides the same look. The pickets of each section interlock and are framed by the top and bottom rails with the finished panel centered between the posts. The result? A full privacy design that both you and your neighbors will love. If you and your neighbors are planning to share costs, the design of the Trex Fence makes it far easier to come to an agreement.

FAQ 8

Is composite fencing worth the cost?

Composite fencing is worth the cost, as long as it fits what you are looking for in a fence. Composite fencing, specifically Trex, offers a beautiful wood aesthetic, without maintenance. Many customers find Trex composite fencing to be worth the cost because they do not have to worry about repairs, staining and painting, and the typical upkeep required by other fence systems.

What is the best composite fencing?

The best composite fencing system out there is Trex Fencing. Trex Fencing is leading the nation in composite fencing, offering the virtues and appeal of a wood fence, while providing superior durability to most vinyl fence systems.

What is the longest-lasting fence?

While there are a couple of different fence materials out there that will last for decades, such as vinyl or masonry, you need to find the longest-lasting fence system that will maintain its aesthetic beauty. While vinyl and masonry fences will crack and break over the years, Trex Fencing is designed to last for at least 25 years with minimal maintenance required.

Where is Trex Fencing made?

Trex Fencing is manufactured in Trex’s plant in Fernley, Nevada. From there, the material is placed on trucks and shipped up to our distribution facility here in Provo, Utah where it is sent out to customers all across the country.

FAQ 9

From the beginning, Trex has been environmentally responsible. The composite material in its decking and fencing line is comprised of 95% recycled content in the form of reclaimed hardwood fibers and plastic film. Over 400 million pounds of plastic and wood is kept from landfills every year and almost 100% of all factory waste is reclaimed. Energy for manufacturing is primarily produced from natural gas, not petroleum sources, and its closed-loop systems save millions of gallons of water per year. No trees have ever been cut down to manufacture Trex products. Trex is also conscious of the additives used in the manufacturing process and does not use any chemicals harmful to the environment.

FAQ 10One of the easiest ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is to reduce the number of miles that trucks haul materials. Trex’s primary manufacturing facilities are located near geographical areas that have large quantities of raw source materials. This supply chain sustainability accounts for the materials used in the majority of all Trex products. Additionally, the manufacturing facilities use methods to reduce energy consumption and eliminate almost all factory waste through reclamation.

Trex and FDS Distributors have been partners in enhancing the outdoor living experience for close to two decades now. To better understand our relationship, as well as what role Trex company is playing in sustainable manufacturing, visit Trex Company and FDS Distributors.

Is Trex made in the U.S.A.?

Sources of Raw Materials and Manufacturing of Trex

All Trex® Decking, Railing, and Fencing products are manufactured in the USA.

Raw Materials in Trex Products
Trex decking (excluding Trex Escapes) and fencing materials are manufactured utilizing a mixture of wood, polyethylene plastic, pigments, and additives. All Trex decking (excluding Trex Escapes) is ICC-ES SAVE certified to be a minimum of 95.4 % recycled content. Trex fencing is also 95% recycled content. Pigments and additives make up a maximum of 5% of the polyethylene stream. The polyethylene stream is 100% recycled and is classified as 35% “Pre-Consumer” and 65% “Post Consumer”. 100% of the wood is classified as “Pre-Consumer” as it’s either recycled or reclaimed from woodworking and furniture manufacturers. Trex materials do not have any added urea-formaldehyde.

Where can I see local installations of Trex Fencing?

If you are wanting to see local installations of Trex Fencing, feel free to call our office at 877-700-8739 and we can check to see what is available in your area.

FAQ 11For obvious reasons, we do not provide any private residential information, but we can direct you to local commercial installations.

Does a fence add value to your home?

Many features of a property add (or detract) from the value. Whether or not a fence will impact the assessed value of a property is debatable. However, a fence can add real value if the prospective owner actually needs one. Even if it doesn’t increase the value of the property, having a quality fence in good condition will not hurt the sale of a property for prospective buyers that are looking for homes with existing fences, but an unattractive or degrading fence could negatively impact the value or sellability of the property when the prospective owner considers the additional expense a new fence will add to the cost of the home after its purchase. On the other hand, if the prospective owner needs a fence and a Trex fence is already on the property, it can add value to the sale of the home both in terms of real dollars and appeal.

A Trex fence requires virtually no maintenance and will last 25+ years. Even an older Trex fence can give the new owner the peace of mind that they will not need to budget for painting, staining, or replacing rotting materials. The name brand alone is a selling feature and the fact that the warranty is transferable from the original owner to the next owner adds even more appeal. Homeowners that purchase Trex fences often look beyond the value of the fence for their own enjoyment and look to the potential of increasing the value of their home for a prospective buyer.

What kind of wood is used for horizontal fences?

Wood used in our Trex Horizons and Seclusions fence is typically hardwoods and softwoods that perform well in outdoor environments. The wood flour in Trex composite provides a natural look and is perfect for horizontal fences.

FAQ 12Learn more about what comprises Trex’s composite material by visiting https://www.trexfencingfds.com/composite-fencing-material/

Which is better Fiberon or Trex?

Both Trex and Fiberon are manufactured using recycled material, and customers who use either are drawn to the natural aesthetic both products offer. In general, however, Trex is a more durable and versatile fence product.

What type of fencing is best?

When deciding what type of fencing is best, it is important to remember that there are all kinds of fencing materials out there that meet different needs, each with its pros and cons. Are you looking for the low-maintenance of vinyl or more for the natural look of wood? Are you wanting something durable, but you don’t want the hassle of installing a masonry wall? Is saving on cost important to you, or are you ready to pay for a more premium product? Trex Fencing is a high-end composite fence product that tries to offer the best virtues from different materials. Visit Trex vs Other Products for a more in-depth comparison of some of the most common fence types on the market right now. In the end, there is no one fence system that is necessarily the best. But there is the right fencing for your particular needs, and it just takes a little bit of research and comparison in order to find it.

FAQ 13FAQ 14FAQ 15FAQ 16

What is the most durable fencing material?

The most durable fencing material out there would probably be a solid slab of masonry wall. However, masonry is a very invasive and foreboding solution for a customer wanting a super durable fence. What’s more, masonry can be quite expensive to repair if cracking occurs due to ground settling. Trex Fencing finds a sweet spot, providing an incredibly durable fence with a relatively easy installation process. While it may not provide the same amount of strength as a masonry wall, most customers find that Trex Fencing suits their needs just fine, and they love all of the added versatility and advantages that Trex has to offer over masonry. Visit Trex vs Masonry for a more in-depth comparison.

FAQ 17

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FAQ 19

What is the best privacy fence?

The best privacy fence is the one that you can love and that suits your needs. Trex Fencing may be that fence. Trex is a premium composite privacy fence that requires minimal work to maintain. Trex beats out vinyl full privacy designs due to its superior durability and natural beauty. The sad truth about wood fencing is that there are no truly fully-private fences. Even board-on-board wood pickets will warp, bend, and shrink over time, causing gaps in the fence. Trex’s unique interlocking picket design keeps the pickets tight with each other, preventing any spaces that would normally result. Visit The Virtues & Benefits of Trex Fencing for a deeper dive into how Trex offers the best option in full-privacy fencing.

FAQ 20

What is composite wood fencing?

Composite wood fencing is an alternative to wood and vinyl fencing. By blending together wood and synthetic materials, composite fencing becomes a fence that has similar durability as a vinyl fence but has more of a natural look similar to a wood fence. Trex Fencing is a premium composite fence product that is backed by a 25-year warranty, which means we are serious about the quality of our fence.

What are the weights and quantities of Trex Fencing material?

Because Trex Fencing is shipped on pallets comprising of individual components, many customers want details regarding the quantities and weights of the material on each pallet. This can aid them in coordinating offloading and handling the material during delivery (note: as a rule of thumb, we only coordinate delivery to locations that have either a forklift or capable skid steer on site, as hand-offloading and pallet jacks are usually inadequate to handle the material). The following list provides both the individual weight of each Trex Seclusions component, as well as the total quantity and combined weight once palletized (if applicable). By way of explanation, a Unit is the term used to describe a pallet that has been fully loaded with components, wrapped, and prepared for shipping.

This information is accessible on our website’s Technical Data. Additionally, you can call our team at 877-700-8739 for more details regarding shipping details, product information, or anything else you may need help with.

Product Description:

8-foot Trex Composite 5”x5” post:

Individual Component Weight – 37 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 36

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 1217 lbs

9-foot Trex Composite 5”x5” post:

Individual Component Weight – 44 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 36

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 1440 lbs

12-foot Trex Composite 5”x5” post:

Individual Component Weight – 50 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 27

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 1440 lbs

Trex Flat Top Post Cap:

Individual Component Weight – 0.8 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 12

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 12 lbs

Trex Pyramid Top Post Cap:

Individual Component Weight – 0.8 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 12

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 12 lbs

Trex Seclusions Top Rail:

Individual Component Weight – 27 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 52

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 1500 lbs

Trex Aluminum Bottom Rail:

Individual Component Weight – 11 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 52

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 640 lbs

91” Trex Seclusions Bottom Rail Cover/Picket:

Individual Component Weight – 8 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 154

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 1150 lbs

67” Trex Composite Picket:

Individual Component Weight – 6 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 154

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 1000 lbs

Trex Seclusions Fence Bracket:

Individual Component Weight – 0.2 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – 96

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – 13 lbs

Trex Seclusions Angle Bracket:

Individual Component Weight – 0.1 lbs

Quantity in Full Units – N/A

Total Unit Weight (w/ Pallet/Box) – N/A

6×8 Trex Seclusions Fence Panel Kit:

Individual Component Weight – 149 lbs

8×8 Trex Seclusions Fence Panel Kit:

Individual Component Weight – 199 lbs

4×6 Trex Seclusions Standard Gate Panel:

Individual Component Weight – 92 lbs

5×6 Trex Seclusions Standard (Large) Gate Panel:

Individual Component Weight – 115 lbs

9′ Gate Post Stiffener (12 Gauge):

Individual Component Weight – 36 lbs

9′ Heavy Duty Gate Post Stiffener ( 8 Gauge):

Individual Component Weight – 75 lbs

12′ Heavy Duty Gate Post Stiffener (8 Gauge):

Individual Component Weight – 102 lbs

Is a Trex Fence load bearing?

Trex Fencing is not designed as a load bearing fence, and should not be used as such.

What material makes a good trash enclosure?

A good trash enclosure is one that functionally works, but also adds appeal to a location that would otherwise be unsightly. For these reasons, Trex Fencing is a great option to consider when installing a trash enclosure. Trex Fencing offers superb durability, as well as a natural, wood-like appearance that catches the eye. Not to mention, it’s less expensive and much easier to install than masonry, which is a typical material used for trash enclosures.

FAQ 21

What is the longest lasting fence?

While there are a couple of different fence materials out there that will last for decades, such as vinyl or masonry, you need to find the longest-lasting fence system that will maintain its aesthetic beauty. While vinyl and masonry fences will crack and break over the years, Trex Fencing is designed to last for at least 25 years with minimal maintenance required. In the end, Trex offers added benefits and virtues that vinyl and masonry can’t offer, such as a natural aesthetic and easier installation. Trex vs Other Products gives a more in-depth comparison to these and other fencing materials.

FAQ 22FAQ 23

What is the best fence to buy?

The best fence to buy is whatever fence suits your needs. Deciding what you are looking for as far as aesthetic, privacy, function, and cost go are a few examples of important issues to consider. At Trex Fencing, we try to blend beauty and function together to create the best privacy fence out on the market. Visit The Virtues & Benefits of Trex Fencing for more information for more information.

FAQ 24

What is Trex Composite Fencing?

Composite fencing is made of a combination of wood fiber and plastic. The wood in composite fencing gives the product strength and beauty while the plastic in the composite fencing gives it greater longevity, resistance to rot and decay and creates a product that requires little maintenance. Composite fencing and gates never needs painting or staining and typically last over 20 years. Trex Fencing was introduced into the market to meet the growing demand for such a fence, as well as to improve upon the design of composite fencing. With Trex, you have the only fully-private composite fence system in the market that provides much greater durability than other composite fencing can offer. Trex makes the best composite fencing with accompanying gates made from a proprietary blend of 95% recycled wood fiber and plastic. This unique product eliminates the negative attributes of typical wood or vinyl fences and gates and capitalizes on their virtues.

FAQ 25

FAQ 26

Visit Virtues & Benefits of Trex Fencing to get more details concerning the value that Trex can offer your landscape.

What is the best vinyl fence to buy?

The best vinyl fence to buy is one that won’t ever break or become brittle and crack. Unfortunately, that is a tall order for most vinyl fencing. Composite fencing was introduced as a more durable alternative to vinyl that also had the added appeal of a wood-like aesthetic. Trex Fencing is a top-rated composite fence product that gives you everything you’re wanting in a vinyl fence and more. Feel free to visit Trex vs Other Products to compare Trex against vinyl and other material.

FAQ 27

What is the most popular Trex fence color?

While all three of our Trex Fencing colors sell successfully, Woodland Brown is hands down our most popular color. Woodland Brown looks like darkly stained wood and fades the least from its original color. It provides high contrast against lighter colors creating a defined border. The deep rich color of Woodland Brown is an elegant addition to any landscape. Visit Trex Fencing Colors for more information regarding all three of our colors.

FAQ 28

What is the best type of fencing?

The best type of fencing is the fence that you can put up once and never have to worry about again. Trex Fencing is designed with a beautiful wood-like appeal, and is manufactured to not rot, twist, split, or become lunch for termites. Did we mention that you will never have to repaint or restain it? Visit https://www.trexfencingfds.com/why-trex/virtues-and-benefits/ to learn more about the virtues and benefits of Trex Fencing.

FAQ 29

What is the average life of a wood fence?

The average life of a wood fence is anywhere around 10-15 years. It is important to remember, though, that a wood fence requires a lot in both time and money to keep it maintained. In order to get the most life out of your wood fence, you will need to repaint, restain, and make necessary repairs about every 3-5 years. Trex Fencing offers a strategic solution to full-privacy wood fence systems, because it offers all of the virtues of wood without the woes of painting, staining, rotting, splitting, warping, fungal decay, and insect damage. In fact, when it comes to the costs associated with a high-end full privacy fence, Trex often-times becomes more cost efficient over time than wood. Not to mention, you won’t have to spend your Saturdays doing all of the up-keep with your Trex Fence like you would with a wood system. Trex vs Wood offers a more in-depth comparison of the two materials.

FAQ 30

FAQ 31

Is the color inside the Trex fence material the same as on the surface?

Trex adds color during the manufacturing process so it exists inside the material as well as outside. The color (pigment) is added early on in the manufacturing process while the plastic and wood are being mixed together and heated. The same concentration of pigment exists in the core of the board as there is on the outside.

The outer surface does appear to be darker initially than the inside of the material. This is due to the size of the wood fibers, as the material goes through the die during extrusion, most of the larger fibers are forced deeper into the core of the board, with only a small part of it exposed to the surface. If you sand away more of the outer surface, which is mostly plastic and very fine wood fibers, more of the larger wood fibers will be exposed. Those larger fibers don’t accept as much pigment, so it will look lighter. As the fence weathers, the exterior becomes lighter and that is why exposed inner material more closely matches the outer surface over time. In the case where your fence has been affected by abrasions during installation, scrapes and dents will become much less visible after a season.

You can learn more about Trex Fencing’s durability here.

FAQ 32

Is Trex Horizons more expensive than Trex Seclusions?

Yes, Trex Horizons is generally a more expensive product than Trex Seclusions. The reason for this is twofold: First, Trex Horizons utilizes a galvanized and powder-coated steel frame that serves to orient the pickets horizontally, which adds tot he material costs. Second, Trex Horizons typically takes a little longer to install per section because the steel components require more assembly than the Trex Seclusions components. That being said, a section of Trex Seclusions (2 posts and all of the material in-between) costs about $510, while a Trex Horizons section costs around $560. As far as labor costs, that would depend on what the contractor decides to charge. You can visit our Online Shop to compare prices, as well as our Seclusions and Horizons pages to see which style best fits what you are looking for.

FAQ 33

FAQ 34

Is Trex fencing insect resistant?

One of the many benefits of Trex Fencing is that is designed to be insect resistant. Termites can quite commonly begin eating up wood fences, effecting both the beauty and integrity of the fence. With Trex, bugs will not be able to find a meal with your fence. Insect resistance is covered under Trex’s 25-year residential warranty, so you can have peace of mind when going with Trex. There are a number of critical advantages that Trex boasts over wood. Insect resistance is just the tip of the iceberg. Trex vs Wood gives a more in-depth comparison.

FAQ 35FAQ 36

Is Trex a Shadow Box Fence?

There are various styles of fencing commonly sold throughout the U.S. One of them is called a “Shadow Box.” It is typically a semi-privacy wood fence that is a modification of the traditional stockade privacy style. Trex is not a shadow box fence. It is more aptly described as a board-on-board fence with a cap-and-trim top and a trim bottom. A shadow box fence alternates pickets on both sides of a rail with gaps between the pickets. Because of this, shadow box styles would not be considered privacy fencing.

A shadow box fence is a design used to help give a wood fence the same look on each side as opposed to the one-sided look of an exposed framing style like a wooden stockade style fence. A fence that looks the same on both sides without exposed framing is something that is already integral to the design of a Trex fence. A shadow box fence requires airflow to help reduce pressure on the fence and compensate for the relative weakness of a standard 4×4 wood post. Some places like communities in Florida require this type of fencing if it is built from wood materials because a wood fence may not be sturdy enough to hold up to high winds. Trex, on the other hand, handles high wind loads without needing spaces between pickets.

This is an example of a Shadow Box wooden fence.

FAQ 37

Trex Fencing has an upscale look based on (and approved upon) a wood fence style of fence called board-on-board, cap & trim.

Here is an example.

FAQ 38The Trex Fence system takes this style of fence to a new level:

  • The pickets of a wood board-on-board fences can warp because wood pickets have a propensity to distort as they age and dry out. Trex pickets don’t overlap — they interlock. The interlocking system is an ingenious way of eliminating screws or nails while still fastening the fence together. The interlocking method creates the illusion of an overlap so the fence gives the appearance of a board-on-board design without the flaws.
  • The “cap-and-trim” aspect of the fence is also superior with Trex. Rather than using three pieces (a “cap” rail such as a 2×4 or 1×6 lying horizontally on top of the fence, and boards running underneath the cap on both sides to create the “trim”), Trex extrudes a one-part T-shaped top rail which slides over the tops of pickets. On a wood fence, it is common to see the cap rail curl up as it weathers or have the trim pieces pull off of the fence. With Trex, the top rail won’t separate into pieces so it always has the clean look with its beautiful shadow lines and dimensions.
  • Trex systems also include a bottom trim piece, which is not necessarily included with all wood fences. The bottom trim serves the functional purpose of hiding the heavy-duty aluminum bottom rail which supports the pickets while also contributing to the design of the fence. The picture frame appearance of the fence draws attention to the body’s shadow lines and dimensions.

Perhaps the most appropriate way of fully describing a Trex Fence would be …

A picture-framed, board-on-board, cap & trim composite fence system.

This graphic illustrates how a Trex fence design accomplishes the appearance of a board-on-board, cap & trim look.

FAQ 39

What is composite fencing?

Composite fencing is made of a combination of wood fiber and plastic. The wood in composite fencing gives the product strength and beauty while the plastic in the composite fencing gives it greater longevity, resistance to rot and decay and creates a product that requires little maintenance. Composite fencing and gates never needs painting or staining and typically last over 20 years. Trex Fencing was introduced into the market to meet the growing demand for such a fence, as well as to improve upon the design of composite fencing. With Trex, you have the only fully-private composite fence system in the market that provides much greater durability than other composite fencing can offer. Trex makes the best composite fencing with accompanying gates made from a proprietary blend of 95% recycled wood fiber and plastic. This unique product eliminates the negative attributes of typical wood or vinyl fences and gates and capitalizes on their virtues.

FAQ 40

FAQ 41Visit Virtues & Benefits of Trex Fencing to get more details concerning the value that Trex can offer your landscape.

What are privacy fences?

Privacy fences are fence systems designed in such a way that it eliminates any spacing between fence pickets. This design makes a privacy fence system your best choice if you are not wanting any neighbors or passersbys to be able to see into your property. Trex Fencing is the leading brand in composite fence privacy systems. For more information regarding the benefits of Trex composite privacy fencing, visit Trex vs Other Products.

FAQ 42

Is Trex plastic?

Trex is not just plastic. It is a wood-plastic composite and benefits from the best attributes of both materials. The plastic provides rot and insect resistance and the wood gives it density, pigmentation, and a natural look. Trex fencing components are also much thicker and more resistant to damage than plastic fences (typically called vinyl or PVC fencing).

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FAQ 44

Check out the differences between Trex and Vinyl for a more in-depth comparison.

What is the most environmentally friendly fence?

We make Trex eco-friendly composite fencing and gates from an innovative blend of 95% recycled wood and plastic. Trex has been this way for more than 25 years, well before ‘green’ was a buzzword. In the end, all of us want to look out on our fences and gates, and know that we’ve done our part. As one of the largest plastic recyclers in the U.S., Trex saves 400 million pounds of plastic and wood from landfills each year.

FAQ 45FAQ 46

Trex’s commitment to environmental sustainability extends beyond the the actual content of the material. Trex takes an active role to ensure our supply vendors operate with ethical and responsible business practices. Approximately 95% of their supply vendors are based in the U.S. Trex conducts supply chain assessments, including in-person reviews, operating facility tours, and work with their suppliers to reduce environmental impact across the supply chain.

FAQ 47As a result, Trex makes it a practice to use post-consumer and post-industrial content wherever possible. Can you find any other fence that does more for the environment than that?

FAQ 48

Is vinyl or Trex Fencing better?

When deciding whether vinyl or composite fencing is better, it is important to remember that both types of materials meet different needs. Vinyl is a low maintenance product that generally comes at a cheaper price than Trex. Many consumers, however, do not like the unnatural and shiny look of vinyl and would prefer to have something more natural-looking. That is where Trex comes in, sporting superior durability and a wood-like aesthetic. Additionally, Trex stands up to the elements better than vinyl. Vinyl will blow out at high wind speeds, whereas Trex has been tested to withstand 130 mph winds. Vinyl notoriously can become brittle and crack over time, something that you won’t need to worry about with Trex.

FAQ 49

FAQ 50

Customers need to weigh the pros and cons and decide what fence product best suits their needs. Visit Trex vs Vinyl for a more in-depth comparison of the two fencing materials.

How tall can a privacy fence be?

Height limitations vary depending on local codes or HOA restrictions, etc. Most privacy fences range anywhere from 4-8 feet, however. Before installation of any fence or privacy screen, we strongly recommend reaching out to local authorities to make sure you obtain the necessary paperwork and to make sure your project meets code requirements.

FAQ 51

Trex privacy fencing is designed to be built as tall as 12 feet high. Fences up to 8 feet tall do not require mid-rails. Fences above 8 feet tall are created by stacking panel kits (one mid-rail for 9-10 ft. tall and two mid-rails for 11-12 ft. tall). You can view shop drawings for Seclusions, with vertical pickets, and Horizons, with horizontal pickets, illustrating placement of brackets, dimensions, and materials needed for the various heights.

FAQ 52

Is Trex considered a green product?

We make Trex eco-friendly composite fencing and gates from an innovative blend of 95% recycled wood and plastic. We’ve been this way for more than 25 years, well before ‘green’ was a buzzword. In the end, all of us want to look out on our fences and gates, and know that we’ve done our part. As one of the largest plastic recyclers in the U.S., Trex saves 400 million pounds of plastic and wood from landfills each year. Get to know Trex a little more and see how much they do to provide a sustainable product for the environment.

FAQ 53FAQ 54

What is a Board-on-Board, Cap & Trim Fence?

Trex could most aptly be described as a board-on-board fence with a cap & trim top and a trim bottom. Trex Fencing has an upscale look based on (and approved upon) a popular wood fence style of fence.

Here is an example of a board-on-board, cap & trim wooden fence with the addition of a trim piece at the bottom.

FAQ 55The Trex Fence system takes this style of fence to a new level:

 

    • The pickets of a wood board-on-board fences can warp because wood pickets have a propensity to distort as they age and dry out. Trex pickets don’t overlap — they interlock. The interlocking system is an ingenious way of eliminating screws or nails while still fastening the fence together. The interlocking method creates the illusion of an overlap so the fence gives the appearance of a board-on-board design without the flaws. Learn more about how the unique design of Trex pickets can enhance your fence.

 

    • The “cap-and-trim” aspect of the fence is also superior with Trex. Rather than using three pieces (a “cap” rail such as a 2×4 or 1×6 lying horizontally on top of the fence, and boards running underneath the cap on both sides to create the “trim”), Trex extrudes a one-part T-shaped top rail which slides over the tops of pickets. On a wood fence, it is common to see the cap rail curl up as it weathers or have the trim pieces pull off of the fence. With Trex, the top rail won’t separate into pieces so it always has the clean look with its beautiful shadow lines and dimensions.

 

  • Trex systems also include a bottom trim piece, which is not necessarily included with all wood fences. The bottom trim serves the functional purpose of hiding the heavy-duty aluminum bottom rail which supports the pickets while also contributing to the design of the fence. The picture frame appearance of the fence draws attention to the body’s shadow lines and dimensions.

Perhaps the most appropriate way of fully describing a Trex Fence would be …

a picture-framed, board-on-board, cap & trim composite fence system.

This graphic illustrates how a Trex fence design accomplishes the appearance of a board-on-board, cap & trim look.

FAQ 56

To learn more about using Trex Fencing pickets with wood rails and posts, visit our product page.

Is composite fencing insect resistant?

One of the virtues of composite fencing is that most brands out there are insect resistant. For example, Trex Fencing is designed to be insect resistant and even backs it up with a 25-year residential warranty.

FAQ 57.

Is Simtek (Bufftech) a composite fence?

SimTek (now called Bufftech Molded Composite Fence) is not a composite fence in the same sense as Trex. SimTek is made fully of synthetic materials (plastic) and thus falls more in line with vinyl fence systems. Trex composite combines wood flour and polyethylene plastic, which gives the fence the unique benefits of both materials, primarily the natural look and density of wood with the low-maintenance benefits of non-organic plastic.

What can I use for deck skirting?

To solve this solution, many homeowners elect to install skirting around the deck, usually out of wood boards to create an appealing barrier.

FAQ 58Of course, if you use wood to skirt your deck, you will need to factor in the time and cost to maintain the skirting’s beauty and function. If you’re using a composite material to build your deck, let’s say, oh I don’t know – Trex – for example, the last thing you’re looking for is probably maintenance.

Fortunately, this is yet another area where Trex Fencing really shines.

FAQ 59Trex Fencing offers full privacy to keep animals out from under your deck, as well as the wonderful low-maintenance qualities to compliment your composite deck. You will never need to paint or stain the fencing, and it can handle the elements much better than wood, or even vinyl, can.

Trex Pickets interlock, greatly decreasing the installation time when compared to wood as well.

FAQ 60

FAQ 61

How tall can a privacy screen be?

Height limitations vary depending on local codes or HOA restrictions, etc. Most privacy screens range anywhere from 4-8 feet, however. Before installation of any fence or privacy screen, we strongly recommend reaching out to local authorities to make sure you obtain the necessary paperwork and to make sure your project meets code requirements.

How can I affordably create privacy in my backyard?

When it comes to full-privacy, wood claims to give that to you at a low cost, but the reality is that no wood fence is full privacy. Overtime, wood boards will warp and bow, creating gaps that defeat the purpose of a full-privacy fence. Not to mention, the costs associated with maintaining your wood fence begin to pile up over the years. Vinyl fencing is an effective full-privacy solution that is more expensive than wood and decidedly less natural-looking. If durability and aesthetics are important factors for you, than vinyl fencing may leave you wanting. Trex is the high end solution for full-privacy. Trex’s board-on-board design offers the same look on both sides, and the interlocking pickets create tension that eliminates warping. While more expensive than wood and vinyl fencing, many customers still ultimately decide that the low maintenance, beauty, and the durability of the fence make it well worth the added cost. As you can see, there are a lot of factors to consider when trying to decide on a fence. Visit Trex vs Other Products to get a better idea of how Trex compares with the competition. Feel free to call our team at 877-700-8739 if you have any additional questions.

FAQ 62

Is 2 feet deep enough for fence posts?

A hole that is 2 feet deep may be enough for your fence posts, but the depth of a post hole depends on several factors. A depth of 2 feet may not be sufficient for the most common fence height of 6 feet tall if your soil is loose, you have high winds, or you have a frostline that’s deeper than 24″. If you aren’t sure if a hole that is 2 feet deep is enough, ask professional installers in your area. They will have enough experience to know the optimal depth.  In general, a depth of at least 30″ is common for a 6-foot tall privacy fence. A lower depth may be necessary if you have a frost line because the ground may heave when it freezes and thaws which will cause the posts to lean. If you are considering a Trex fence and want to make sure you get 30″ in the ground for 6-foot tall fencing, be sure to order the 9-foot posts. If you do not need to go that deep, we sell 8′ posts. And, if you need to go deeper, we also offer 12′ posts. As a rule of thumb, we also recommend consulting our Installation Guides, as well as consulting with local installation experts.

FAQ 63

How much does a Trex post weigh?

Trex posts are quite heavy due to the fact that they are designed to withstand a beating from the elements, including hurricane force winds. The 8′ tall post weighs 37 pounds, the 9′ tall post weighs 44 pounds, and the 12′ tall post weighs 50 pounds.

FAQ 64

As you can see from this comparison, Trex is designed to give you the durability that you can’t quite get from other fence systems, especially most vinyl fencing.

FAQ 65

Your fence is only as strong as your post. With Trex Fencing, you can have peace of mind knowing that Trex Posts designed with Strength and Versatility in mind.

How much does a 6 foot vinyl privacy fence cost?

A 6-foot vinyl privacy fence can cost between $100 to $400 per 6×8 section of fence. The price variance is due to the differences in quality and brand. Higher-end vinyl fences will last longer. Upgrade to Trex composite fencing as an alternative to a 6-foot vinyl privacy fence. The price is similar to high-end vinyl fencing, but the material is much thicker and more natural-looking. The Trex brand has also been in continuous production for almost three decades and its success makes it the world’s leader in outdoor building materials. Check out Trex vs Vinyl for a more in-depth comparison.

FAQ 66

FAQ 67

How wide is a section of Trex Fence?

Our Trex Seclusions system is designed to be 8 feet (96 inches) wide on center of the posts. Our Trex Horizons system is designed to be 97 inches on center, so just over 8 feet. Trex Fencing is not offered in any other widths, but the material cuts like regular lumber, allowing you to shorten the span of your fence if desired.

FAQ 68

How much does a section of Trex fence weigh?

One 6 ft high section of Trex Fence, which includes two posts, pickets, rails, and everything else in between, weighs about 240 lbs. Trex Fencing materials are designed with strength, durability, and versatility in mind, which is why the material is heavier than many other fence systems.

FAQ 69This is important to keep in mind when ordering Trex Fencing, as this is not typically something that can be off-loaded by hand from the truck. We require shipping locations to have a forklift on-sight to handle the material. If you’re a homeowner and don’t have access to a forklift, don’t panic! In most cases, we are able to arrange for the shipping company to provide a forklift service. Keep in mind though that this will add to your shipping costs. In other cases, we can ship the material to a nearby freight terminal. If you have access to a double-axle trailer, you can pick up your order there and the terminal service will load the material for you at no extra charge.

FAQ 70Fortunately, the weight of the material means that your Trex Fence is designed to last. Trex Fencing can take a beating from kids, animals, the elements, and time. The Benefits & Virtues of Trex Fencing gives more detail concerning the advantages of Trex over other common fencing materials.

How tall can a Trex privacy fence be?

Trex privacy fencing is designed to be built as tall as 12 feet high. Fences up to 8 feet tall do not require mid-rails. Fences above 8 feet tall are created by stacking panel kits (one mid-rail for 9-10 ft. tall and two mid-rails for 11-12 ft. tall). You can view shop drawings for Seclusions, with vertical pickets, and Horizons, with horizontal pickets, illustrating placement of brackets, dimensions, and materials needed for the various heights.

FAQ 71

FAQ 72

How much does a 6 foot privacy fence cost?

The cost of a 6-foot privacy fence depends on the type of material used and if you are installing it yourself or paying someone else to do it. Where you are located can also make a difference, primarily for the cost of labor. For materials, a simple 6-foot wood privacy fence can cost as low as $25 a foot, although these types of wood fences won’t last very long. If you upgrade to high quality, pre-stained wood, you may pay $40+ per foot for materials. Vinyl fences also have ranges depending on quality, color, and brand. A cheap vinyl 6-foot privacy fence can be similar to a cheap wood fence in price, whereas a high-end vinyl fence can cost more than $50 per foot. Trex composite 6-foot privacy fence costs about $55 per foot for materials. Since it is the sturdiest low-maintenance alternative to wood fencing, it tends to be the best overall value if you are looking for a long-lasting fence. For installation, you can expect to add $10-$25 per linear foot for any style of fence in most areas of the country and more than that in high-cost markets. When deciding how much you’re willing to spend on your fence, keep in mind that there are other costs in maintenance as well as hours spent keeping your fence looking great. This is where Trex stacks on the value. Trex never needs to be stained or painted, and you don’t have to worry about replacing rotted posts or sections that have been eaten up by insects. Not to mention, it’s durability far surpasses that of vinyl and wood. Trex vs Other Products goes into a more detailed comparison of fencing materials.

FAQ 73FAQ 74

FAQ 75

How much are wooden fence panels?

Wooden fence panels can be quite inexpensive initially. Until recently, some were as low as $100 per 6×8 panel. However, many dealers are moving away from pre-built wood panels as availability, price, and quality get progressively worse. A major consideration when looking at how much wooden fence panels are going to cost you is the long-term expectation of ongoing expense. Most wood panels will require yearly maintenance in the form of painting or staining and repairs. Wood fences are made from materials that will eventually rot, after all, so making sure they last longer will require costly upkeep. You can improve the longevity of a wooden fence panel by buying pre-stained, unassembled high-quality materials, but at some point, buying an alternative becomes the more logical choice. If you are already going to pay more than $250 for materials to make a wooden panel for example, you might as well buy a manufactured product like Trex that doesn’t require painting or staining and is resistant to rot and insect damage. A 6×8 Trex fence panel retails for approximately $340 per panel and includes all the materials you need to build an entire section other than posts and caps. Over the lifespan of your wood fence spent painting and replacing a few broken posts or pickets, Trex can actually end up being more cost effective. Visit Benefits & Virtues of Trex Fencing to better understand the overall value that Trex has to offer.

FAQ 76

How long will a Trex Fence last?

Trex Fencing comes with a 25-year manufacturing warranty, which means that our fence is built to last. Trex posts are 1 1/4” thick, which is over 3 times that of a vinyl post. This means that Trex posts will be able to withstand the elements, and the general wear and tear over time much better than vinyl fences can.

FAQ 77

When you put a wood fence in the ground, it immediately begins to depreciate. Wood rots, splits, and decays, making it significantly less beautiful 10-15 years down the road, especially if it has not been properly maintained.

FAQ 78

Trex’s wood and plastic blend marries the best of both wood and vinyl together to create a fence that can withstand the natural depreciation that other fence materials experience.

FAQ 79

Of course, no fence will last a long time if proper care of the fence is neglected. However, Trex Fencing requires little work to maintain and thus makes it easy for our customers to be able to enjoy their Trex Fence for years and years to come.

How long has Trex Fencing been around?

In the early 2000’s, vinyl and wood fencing were flourishing in our market. However, there was not a product that was durable, low maintenance, and also beautiful and functional. Wood and Vinyl fencing fit some of these requirements but not all of them. Seeing the success that we were having in the decking market with Trex composite decking, we approached Trex with an idea of creating a composite fence. The rest is history.

FAQ 80

FAQ 81

For the next several years, we worked hand in hand with Trex’s R&D department creating a composite fence that mimicked the look and strength of our most popular wood fence style at that time, only now with a material that would not rot, split, need painting or staining and could withstand extreme climates. With our expertise in fencing and Trex’s expertise in manufacturing, it was the perfect partnership for creating a fence product that was sure to be successful.

FAQ 82

Introduced in 2005, Trex Seclusions® fencing has lead the way in establishing composite materials as high end alternatives to wood and vinyl. As the most successful first generation of composite materials and the leading generation in fencing, Trex composite combines a natural look with low maintenance.

How does Trex compare as a sound barrier?

Trex has sound barrier attributes and has been shown to suppress noise. The interlocking picket system and dense material create an effective sound barrier to mute traffic noise or other environmental noise. While a masonry wall is superior for this specific function, Trex Fencing is frequently used as a barrier because it provides a level of sound abatement needed for moderate reduction without the cost, construction limitations, and lack of appeal inherent in a concrete or block wall. Trex vs Masonry provides a more in-depth comparison of these two materials.

FAQ 83

Trex finds a sweet spot, so to speak. So while masonry may be the best noise reduction on the market right now, Trex can provide you with additional benefits that you can’t find with masonry.

FAQ 84If you’d like more details concerning Trex’s noise reduction capabilities, you can review the official acoustical testing for more details.

Do horizontal fences last?

Horizontal fences can last as long as vertical fences. The longevity of any fence is more dependent on the material used and the installation method than on the orientation of the boards. For example, a horizontal Trex fence will last longer than a horizontal wood fence. Trex does not rot and is resistant to insects, whereas a wood fence is not. Properly installed, a horizontal Trex fence in most climates will last 25+ years.

FAQ 85

Visit Trex Horizons to learn more about the advantages and virtues of our horizontal fencing.

How long do privacy screens last?

The lifetime of a privacy screen varies depending on quite a few factors. Four big ones are 1) the material used to build the screen, 2) how it was installed, 3) the climate and natural conditions of the area, and 4) how well the screen has been maintained.

FAQ 86

Wood, for example, looks beautiful but quickly depreciates over time.

FAQ 87

Vinyl screens trade natural beauty for low maintenance. However, over time, vinyl becomes brittle and does not stand up well to extreme weather conditions. It may last forever, but it won’t look pretty while it does.

FAQ 88

Masonry walls are effective and durable, but unless you’re building a castle, they may seem a bit foreboding as a privacy screen. And if they do crack, they are a beast to repair.

FAQ 89

Trex Fencing has been used by many customers as a privacy screen because of its low maintenance and it’s durability over time. Trex Fencing sports a 25 year warranty, which means it is built to last. What’s more, Trex was designed to be a DIY product, so you can tackle it as a summer project, saving you on installation fees. The fence can easily be installed in the ground, or as a screen on top of your deck or patio. Our website provides detailed Installation Resources for both our Seclusions and our Horizons fencing styles, and our team of product experts can be reached during normal business hours Monday-Friday at 877-700-8739.

The Virtues of Trex Fencing extend well-beyond its durability and ease of installation, however. For one thing, it is a beautiful fence. Our 3 rich colors complement any landscape, providing a natural wood aesthetic. The product is dyed during the manufacturing process, which means you’ll never have to paint or stain your fence.

Trex Fencing has a unique board-on-board design that will not only set it apart from other fences in your neighborhood, the neighbors themselves will love the fact that the fence looks the same on both sides. No one gets the ugly side of the fence, because both sides are beautiful.

As mentioned previously, there are many factors that go into determining how long a privacy screen will last. While no one type of material is perfect, you can minimize the effort needed to maintain your screen while maximizing its beauty and aesthetic by going with Trex Fencing,

How long does composite fencing last?

How long a composite fence lasts depends on the quality, design, and installation of the brand. There are only a few manufacturers that have successfully designed a composite material that will last for at least a couple of decades. However, only one has designed a system that can also handle the requirements for durability in high winds, harsh heat and cold, and incidental contact that can cause damage. Trex introduced its fencing system in 2005, making it the fence with the longest track record. A Trex composite fence is expected to last at least 25 years without requiring any significant maintenance. It is a rot and insect resistant fence and is designed intelligently for longevity while also maintaining an elegant appearance.

Has Trex Fencing been discontinued?

Trex Fencing has not been discontinued and is actually a leading brand in composite fencing in the nation. When it comes to design, function, and durability, no other composite fencing compares! Virtues & Benefits of Trex Fencing goes into more details as to how Trex Fencing can beautify your landscape. Trex vs Other Composites gives an in-depth comparison of multiple fence systems out on the market right now. Peruse our website and see if Trex Fencing is a good fit for you. If you have questions, you can try typing your question into the search. If that doesn’t get you the answer you need, you can call our team of experts at 877-700-8739.

FAQ 90

Do you offer self-closing hinges?

Trex Fencing does not offer self-closing hinges for various reasons but one of the most important reasons is that self-closing hinges much more prone to malfunction than non-self-closing hinges. Having said that, there are multiple third-party products on the market that could be added to a Trex gate. Some of our clients have used products from Locinox and Lockey. While we do not endorse any particular client and are unable to provide any warranty or support for their usage on our products, other companies’ self-closing hinges can work with Trex gates. We recommend doing your own research and reviewing installation guides before settling on a product.

If you decide to use non-self-closing hinges fabricated specifically for our pre-built gates, they can be ordered from our Online Shop.

TREX FENCING FDS HINGES FOR PRE-BUILT GATES

FAQ 91

Do I need a mid rail for an 8' Tall fence?

A mid-rail is not necessary for an 8′ tall Trex fence. Adding one is an option if so desired, but the fence is designed to be built up to 8′ tall and 8′ wide without mid rails. For commercial applications or places where an even stronger fence than the standard Trex configuration is required, a mid-rail will provide even more support and can easily be added by cutting the pickets in half and placing brackets midway up the post with a second bottom rail, which serves as the mid-rail. Our Architectural Drawings provide more details on our fencing components, including how to incorporate midrails.

FAQ 92

Does vinyl or Trex Fencing last longer?

While vinyl technically lasts longer than composite fencing, you want to make sure that the beauty of your fence is what lasts. Sure, plastic will sit in a landfill for a hundred years, but Trex composite fencing is designed to maintain its aesthetic appeal with higher durability than most vinyl fencing for at least 25 years. Visit Trex vs Vinyl for a more in-depth comparison.

FAQ 93FAQ 94FAQ 95

Does composite fencing discolor?

Composite fencing will usually experience changes in color as the fence weathers, including Trex. This weathering process is natural and does not effect the integrity of the fence itself. As a way to counteract the fading process, the product is over-pigmented when it is manufactured. As a result of this practice the fencing arrives significantly darker than it will be once it has had an opportunity to weather. As Trex Fencing is exposed to UV light, the product will fade to its true weathered color. After initial weathering has occurred, typically within a season of exposure to sunlight, any additional fading is minimal and Trex will retain color throughout its life. You can learn more under the resource tab on our website.

FAQ 96

How do I fill holes in the fence materials?

If you have holes in your Trex posts or rails, you can easily patch them. Most holes can be filled with very little visibility after the repair. If you have very large holes or the holes are in the pickets, you may need to replace the component.

Methods of filling holes in Trex composite components

Small holes with mushroomed material remaining

If the hole is very small, the mass that surrounds the hole has usually been displaced and has risen above the surface of the Trex material. Pinch together the mass that has mushroomed out of the hole and press it back into the hole. Lightly tap the material with a hammer to flatten it.

Medium size holes

If the hole is large enough that insufficient displaced surface material surrounds the hole, use a wad of Trex sawdust from a waste material, compress it between your fingers into a ball and press the mass tightly into the hole. Tap the wad lightly with a hammer to compress it even further into the space. Afterwards, carefully use a flat head screwdriver or similar to scrape off any excess without scratching the Trex material. Adding a drop of glue to the ball before pressing it into the hole can help keep the wad in place if the hole is more than the size of a screw.
Large holes
If the hole is even larger, it may be necessary to make a plug. Take a clean chip of Trex material that is slightly larger than the hole and tap it in lightly until it is even with the surrounding surface. Gently scrape off extra material being careful not to scratch the surface around it. If you want an even cleaner look, use a tool called a  hollow punch, drill out a piece of Trex waste material to create a circular plug. Hollow punches can be purchased at any hardware or box store. If necessary, make the hole more uniformly circular to allow the plug to fit snugly. Run a small bead of exterior-compatible glue or caulk around the inside of the hole then press the plug into place.
If desired, add a touch of matching stain to the finished work to make it more uniform with the surrounding material.

FAQ 97

Does Timbertech make fencing?

Timbertech discontinued its fencing line around 2010 choosing instead to focus on its core decking lines. Like Fiberon and other composite manufacturers, Timbertech was unable to create a viable market for its fencing product. Trex, on the other hand, introduced its fencing line in 2005 and has continued to manufacture its fencing without interruption since then. The design of the Trex fencing system is the primary reason for its longevity. Rather than attempting to emulate a standard wood fence design like Timbertech’s Fencescapes product or cut corners by only selling a flat composite picket as some composite manufacturers do, Trex engineered a fence system that leverages the best attributes of its composite material with a design that is not only aesthetically stunning but has durability benefits. To make sure the fence is available and affordable everywhere, Trex partners with FDS Fence Distributors to distribute its product nationally. FDS has built a vast distribution network through contractors and suppliers so Trex is available in every market for DIY and installation customers.

FAQ 98

FAQ 99

Visit Trex vs Other Composites on our website in order to learn more about how Trex compares to other composite material out there.

Does Trex melt in the hot sun?

Trex fence posts do not melt in the hot sun. The posts are made to withstand high heat and perform very well in hot, sunny climates.

Can I put lattice on top of my Trex Fence?

Many customers want to put a decorative piece on top of their fence, such as lattice of some kind. While we do not offer any of those products, decorative pieces can be added to compliment your Trex Fence with some creativity. You can view our Gallery to see some of the creative ways customers have customized our fencing. Trex does offer Lattice panels that can be ordered separately as well.

FAQ 100One important thing to note is that you will want to check your local codes or HOA rules to make sure that you are not exceeding any height restrictions for your community.

How to make a lattice panel on top of my Trex Fence

Here is a concept on how to add a lattice panel to your Trex Fence. Using a second top rail, two additional bracket, and pieces cut from extra pickets, you, could easily build this design.

Instructions:

Decide on the height of the panel you want and purchase your own panels accordingly. We suggest using a lattice panel that is no thicker than 1/4″ so you can use pieces of Trex pickets to wedge the panel into place.

Build the privacy portion of the Trex fence by cutting down the pickets to the desired height. Finish off the pickets with a top rail which will serve as your mid rail.

Rip cut the “knuckles” off extra pickets. You will use these as supports to sandwich the lattice panel on top of the mid-rail and to wedge the lattice panel inside the top rail channel.

Place the top rail over the lattice and secure every in place with finish nails or trim head composite screws.

Note: since a customer would be combining a self-sourced third-party product with Trex and ultimately devising their own design, this is offered as a suggestion only to give the customer an idea of a potential method of building a Trex fence with lattice panels. 

FAQ 101

Does Trex offer a picket fence design?

Trex does not manufacture a picket fence design, but rather a full privacy system with unique interlocking pickets.

FAQ 102

FAQ 103

While customers have purchased individual Trex pickets in order to customize their own design, Trex does not offer any other design other than our full-privacy fence.

FAQ 104Keep in mind that Trex pickets sport a “C” channel design, and thus may not be what you are needing if you are wanting a picket fence. It all depends on the look you are going for. if you are not absolutely sold on the idea of a picket fence, then we would love to introduce you to the benefits of Trex’s revolutionary full-privacy system. The Benefits and Virtues of Trex Fencing include a picture frame look with a board-on-board design, and incredibly low maintenance compared to wood fencing. Trex’s durability far surpasses that of vinyl, and can even hold up great during hurricane-force winds.

FAQ 105

If you’re curiosity has been piqued, then check out Trex vs Other Products, or continue to type your questions in the search. Our team of experts is also available during normal business hours 8am-5pm, Monday-Friday, MST. They can help answer any questions you have.

How do I hide the gap between my gate panel and posts?

When a Trex gate panel is installed, a gap is left between the panel and the posts. This is necessary to allow the gate panel to function properly. The optimal gaps between the posts and panels is 1″ on either end of the gate. If the gap were smaller, the hinges and/or latches would bind or the gate would rub during the natural expansion and contraction of the composite material.

If you have concerns about being able to see through the gap, here is a tip to help you fill in the gap without interfering with the performance of the gate.

 

    • Hang and adjust your gate as instructed in the installation guide.

 

    • Cut off the edge of a picket (called the “knuckle”) to create a long strip that is 3/4″ deep x 1″ wide.

 

    • Use screws to attach the strip to the post opposite the direction the gate swings. Pre-drill holes so the material doesn’t split.

 

    • Make sure the strip will not interfere in any way with movement of the gate and hardware.

 

    • On the latch side, you will need to cut the strip into two pieces and put them above and below the latch.

 

  • Do not attempt to put the filler strips in between the gate panel and posts. When the gate material expands, the gate will no longer be able to open if you do.

FAQ 106

FAQ 107

Can I rip or cut a Trex picket in order to get the width I want?

Though you can rip a Trex picket to get the width you want, this is strongly discouraged in most cases unless you are building a Horizons fence and the bottom picket needs to be trimmed for height (see detail below). Trex Fencing pickets offer a unique “C channel” design, providing much of the strength of the fence and it is crucial for a successful installation.

FAQ 108

FAQ 109In the case of either Seclusions or Horizons fence systems, there are times when adjusting the span of the fence section may be necessary. As previously stated, in the case of Seclusions, cutting or ripping the picket is not a viable solution. This is the same for Horizons, with one exception. So, if ripping the picket should be avoided in the majority of cases, what can you do to adjust the width of the fence? Let’s start with Seclusions first:

Seclusions:

Instead of ripping the picket, you can adjust the spacing of the interlocking pickets and lock them in place with finishing nails or trim head composite screws in order to get the width you need for your section.

FAQ 110

Importantly, many situations in which you would be shortening the span of the fence would require you to cut top and bottom rails to length, and then you would remove the needed amount of pickets from the section. Many customers cut their sections back in order to fit spaces that just would not work for a full 8 foot section.

FAQ 111

FAQ 112

You can view our Seclusions Installation Guide that explains how to adjust the spacing of your pickets in more detail. Look on pages 12 & 13 for instructions.

Ripped picket alternative:

If you prefer to rip the picket next to the post, cut the knuckle off the edge of the last picket to use as a C-channel against the post. The remainder of the picket can be ripped to fit into the channel. You will need to make sure the channel sits between the top rail and bottom rail so the ripped picket will fit in alignment with the rest of the pickets. Screw or tack the ripped picket to the knuckle.

FAQ 113

Horizons:

As was mentioned with Seclusions, shortening the span of the fence can be accomplished by cutting the composite and steel components to the desired length. Because the pickets are oriented horizontally, there is no need to adjust the spacing of the pickets. However, some adjustments may be necessary if you are trying to change the height of the fence. Of course, you can cut the material and remove any amount of pickets that you need to. But in the case of ripping or cutting the picket to adjust spacing, cutting or ripping the picket is discouraged except for in the case of the last picket.

The steel bottom rail is hung over the last picket, and then the rail itself is screwed into the composite material. When the pickets are manufactured, the material is extruded to the proper dimensions in order to provide an approximate 1” gap between the ground and the steel bottom rail. But these dimensions are nominal, and there are times when the fence body is too long and the bottom rail will hit the ground without an adjustment. In these cases, cutting the last picket is a suitable solution.

FAQ 114

The ripped (or cut) end of the picket can be inserted into the bottom rail and then attached with screws. This allows you to make adjustments to the bottom of your fence, keeping it from direct contact with the ground. This also gives you an added level of variability in adjusting the height of your fence if desired. Our Horizons Installation Guide provides more details in regards to general installation, measurements, instructions, etc.

FAQ 115So, in summary, ripping your Trex picket is not recommended in almost all applications. We do recommend it only in the case of adjusting the bottom of your Horizons fence. In Seclusions, the “C” channel design of the pickets is a critical element of the fence design. You can achieve the desired width for your fence section by cutting the material and spacing out the pickets accordingly, and then using finish nails or composite screws to secure any gaps between the interlocking “knuckles” of the pickets.

Of course, if you ever have any questions, you can call our team at 877-700-8739 and we would be happy to help you out with your installation.

Does wood or Trex Fencing last longer?

Trex composite fencing is designed to last longer than wood fencing. While wood fencing begins to depreciate the moment you put it in the ground, Trex composite fencing maintains it’s durability and beautiful design for at least 25 years. Wood fences usually are in dire straights by about 15 years, especially if you have not put the work and money into maintaining it. With virtually no maintenance required other than the occasional wash, Trex composite fencing is a long-term solution to the woes of wood fencing. Visit Trex vs Wood for a more in-depth comparison.

FAQ 116FAQ 117

Does PVC fencing fade?

Even with UV inhibitors, most plastics fade over time. Historically, this is the reason vinyl or PVC fencing was only manufactured in light colors like white or tan. New vinyl fences have more advanced UV inhibition to help reduce the fade. When considering a fence for your property, fading may not necessarily be a factor if you understand how the color will transform over time. For example, if you prefer the look of a light coastal cedar fence, a grey PVC or composite fence will have that appearance after fading. The bigger issue than fading is whether or not the fence will retain its color or change its color over time. Most PVC and composite fences will fade, but they will not lose their color or change to another color throughout the weathering process.

Does Trex make lattice panels?

Trex does make a lattice. Trex’s licensed partner, Acurio Latticeworks, manufactures a lattice system that can be used for a variety of purposes in conjunction or separately from Trex’s other products. For example, like other types of lattice panels, Trex Latticeworks can be added to a Trex fence to create a beautiful semi-privacy design. A popular style is full privacy at the bottom of the fence panel using Trex’s standard pickets and rails, then lattice privacy panel between a mid-rail and the top rail. Trex Latticeworks can be cut to fit sections of whatever length is needed and it comes in a variety of heights. While Trex lattices cannot be ordered from us, you can visit Trex LatticeWorks for more information.

Looking for ideas on how build Trex Fencing with lattice panels? See the link to a related article with a suggestion for a lattice installation concept.

FAQ 118

Does Fiberon make fencing?

Fiberon no longer manufactures fencing. The company discontinued its fencing line in 2019. Consumers looking for a composite fencing alternative to Fiberon (also known as Woodshades at Lowe’s and Veranda composite at Home Depot) should consider Trex. Since 2005, Trex fencing has been in continuous production and is available by special order in all markets and through major box stores including Lowe’s and Home Depot.

Does composite fencing shrink?

With wood fences, boards will shrink as they weather because moisture evaporates out of the boards. Composite fence boards act differently because they are dense and won’t dry out as they age. That’s why composite fence boards that are butted together tend to bulge and warp when the fence material heats up in the sun. If you prefer a composite fence system, choose Trex. The fence boards are specifically designed to maintain the full privacy look as the boards expand and contract. Trex accommodates shrinking by using an ingenious interlocking picket system that gives the fence the necessary movement it needs to help the material avoid separation. Trex is also a better option for wood fence boards if you want to avoid gaps altogether.

FAQ 119
FAQ 120Visit our article about Trex’s Smart Design to learn more about the benefits of our Trex pickets.

Does composite fencing sag?

Whether or not a composite fence sag is dependent on the design of the fence. Composite fences that do not use metal reinforcement for rails are most likely going to sag over time. Trex Fencing is built with a sturdy aluminum bottom rail that supports the weight of the fence. The rail is covered by composite boards, hiding the aluminum. This gives you the aesthetic wood-like appearance of Trex with the reinforcement necessary to protect the fence from sagging.

FAQ 121FAQ 122

Our installation resources offer more information, and can be accessed by visiting https://www.trexfencingfds.com/resources/seclusions-install-guides/

What are the dimensions of the steel post used with Horizons?

For our Horizons fencing line, we do offer steel posts in addition to our standard composite Trex posts.

FAQ 123

These posts are only offered in 9′ lengths and are 2.5″x2.5″ 14ga. The only color they come in is matte black.

FAQ 124

These steel posts are a great option for customers looking to maximize the modern, contemporary design that Trex Horizons offers.

FAQ 125

For our Horizons fencing line, we do offer steel posts in addition to our standard composite Trex posts.

FAQ 123

These posts are only offered in 9′ lengths and are 2.5″x2.5″ 14ga. The only color they come in is matte black.

FAQ 124

These steel posts are a great option for customers looking to maximize the modern, contemporary design that Trex Horizons offers.

FAQ 125

What is the material used for fence brackets?

Trex fence brackets are made of high strength material called glass-filled nylon. By adding powdered glass to the nylon resin or extruding the plastic with glass fibers, the raw material in glass-filled nylon takes on several beneficial properties:

 

    • Material stiffness is up to 80 percent greater than common plastics

 

    • Tensile strength is up to 70 percent greater than common plastics

 

    • The thermal expansion rate that is roughly half of unfilled nylon, providing increased stability when exposed to temperature changes

 

  • The hardness is 50 percent greater than common plastics

Trex Fencing bracket material and the bracket design were used in the development of the component specifically because they offer far superior performance benefits over a metal or standard plastic component. Combined with the 5/8″ wall thickness of a Trex post, Trex fence brackets add to the overall strength of the fence system, handling high wind loads and common incidental stress from low impact events (such as balls kicked against the fence or lawnmower bumps) that happen across the life of a fence.

Can you mount a panic bar on a Trex gate?

It is not uncommon for installers to wonder if a panic bar can be installed on a Trex gate, most typically for commercial or industrial installations. Panic bars are specifically used for locations where the designers are concerned with individuals being able to exit safely and quickly during emergency situations.

One of the many benefits of Trex Fencing is it’s versatility and strength, which allows it to support the weight and design of a panic bar.

FAQ 129

We offer the Lockey ED61 silver panic bar kit (pictured above) that needs to be assembled on site during installation. While we do not offer any installation guides on how to assemble the panic bar, Lockey’s website offers instructions for a successful installation.

Where is Trex Fencing made?

Trex Fencing is manufactured in Trex’s plant in Fernley, Nevada. From there, the material is placed on trucks and shipped up to our distribution facility here in Provo, Utah where it is sent out to customers all across the country.

FAQ 130

From the beginning, Trex has been environmentally responsible. The composite material in its decking and fencing line is comprised of 95% recycled content in the form of reclaimed hardwood fibers and plastic film. Over 400 million pounds of plastic and wood is kept from landfills every year and almost 100% of all factory waste is reclaimed. Energy for manufacturing is primarily produced from natural gas, not petroleum sources, and its closed-loop systems save millions of gallons of water per year. No trees have ever been cut down to manufacture Trex products. Trex is also conscious of the additives used in the manufacturing process and does not use any chemicals harmful to the environment.

FAQ 131One of the easiest ways to reduce greenhouse gas emissions is to reduce the number of miles that trucks haul materials. Trex’s primary manufacturing facilities are located near geographical areas that have large quantities of raw source materials. This supply chain sustainability accounts for the materials used in the majority of all Trex products. Additionally, the manufacturing facilities use methods to reduce energy consumption and eliminate almost all factory waste through reclamation.

Trex and FDS Distributors have been partners in enhancing the outdoor living experience for close to two decades now. To better understand our relationship, as well as what role Trex company is playing in sustainable manufacturing, visit Trex Company and FDS Distributors.

What is Trex Fencing (and what it isn't)?

    • Trex is an integrated system of extruded components.

 

    • It is not dimensional composite lumber like decking.

 

    • If you are looking for composite pickets only, the Seclusions pickets are made to interlock. They are not flat boards to mount to back rails, although they could be attached this way by screwing through the edges.

 

    • Trex is a composite materials brand. If the profiles you want are anything other than what can be found on TrexFencingFDS.com or Trex.com, they are not Trex profiles.

 

    • If the Trex Seclusions picket simply won’t work for your project, you could look into Trex composite decking boards. Just so you know, they are a full 1″ so they are quite heavy. We don’t work with the decking profiles so visit Trex.com to find a supplier or contractor near you.

 

    • We do not sell competing composite products and aren’t able to help you source them. Other composite manufacturers are typically short-lived so unless you are using actual Trex brand materials, we aren’t able to provide support for replacement parts in the future.

 

Does Trex Fencing age well?

Trex Fencing does age extremely well when compared to wood and vinyl fencing. When you install a wood or vinyl fence, the material immediately begins to depreciate. Wood will rot and twist with time. Vinyl fencing can turn an unsightly yellowish over time. Scuffs and abrasions add up over time for both fence materials, and wood fencing requires consistent maintenance to keep it looking anywhere close to new. Vinyl fencing is notorious for becoming brittle and cracking over time.

FAQ 132

FAQ 133

Trex is designed to resist rotting, splitting, and decay and is covered under the Trex Fencing Warranty. While Trex Fencing’s color will fade over time, the material fades to an aesthetically pleasing shade and then never loses its color.

FAQ 134

Scuffs and abrasions on a Trex Fence actually tend to blend in over time since the color of the fence is dyed throughout the material, which means that the scuffs will weather and even out the coloring. This also means that you will never need to spend a single Saturday painting or staining your fence.

FAQ 135Trex Fencing material is considerably thicker and more durable than most vinyl fencing, which means that it resists cracking and won’t become brittle with age. The cherry on top of all of this is how simple it is to clean. In most cases, hot soapy water and a soft bristle brush will effectively remove dirt and grime from the fence. With a little bit of consistency, you can keep your Trex Fence clean with minimal effort. When compared to other popular fencing material, Trex repeatedly blows the competition away. Trex is built to not only last, but to look amazing for years and years to come.

Does the color of a Trex Fence fade or have variation?

The color of Trex Fencing fades to a degree through a natural weathering process. Color fading in general is a well known phenomena that occurs when plastic and pigments are exposed to UV light. To counter the full impact of sunlight, the product is over-pigmented during manufacturing and engineered to maintain pigmentation throughout its life. As a result of this practice, the fencing arrives significantly darker and in a different hue than it will be once it has had an opportunity to weather (this is particularly noticeable in Winchester Grey which has a brownish color when it is new). Trex engineers have worked with pigmentation over the years to set a specific color value during production to allow the product to fade from its original color to an intended lighter color which is still vibrant, attractive, and natural looking.

FAQ 136

The majority of the fading typically takes a season of exposure to the sun. After initial weathering has occurred, any additional fading is minimal and Trex will retain color throughout its life. You can learn more by visiting Trex Fencing Colors on our website.

Note regarding variation: Some variation may exist between the individual components. This occurs because the recycled material in Trex composite comes from a variety of sources and can interact differently with the pigmentation. Variation is not considered a manufacturing defect and is not covered under warranty.  To learn more, see our Trex Fencing Colors page. If you prefer to minimize variation, group pickets of similar hues.

Note regarding post caps: Post caps are not manufactured in the same facility as the rest of the Trex composite components. The raw material content and manufacturing of the caps is also a bit different than the rest of the fence. The caps are created with molds and therefore require a different formulation than the other components which are extruded. Because of the distinct ways the pigment is applied to the profiles as they are manufactured, the caps may look different when new than the rest of the fence. This difference is particular noticeable on a Winchester Grey fence when it is first installed but becomes much less visible as the fence weathers (example of a new fence with a new cap)

To help you visualize what to expect, here are examples of weathering over time:

FAQ 137

FAQ 138

FAQ 139

Are Trex Fencing Posts the same as Trex Railing Posts?

The Trex railing sleeves are not the same product as the fence posts. The Trex railing sleeves are a plastic-heavy composite that look more similar to a vinyl material than the Trex composite material used for the fencing and the core of the decking products. The railing components are used strictly as sleeves (sliding over 4×4 or 6×6 nominal posts attached to a deck). They cannot be used as standalone posts, whereas the Trex Fencing post is meant to be a self-supporting component. The hollow cavity of the Trex Fencing post does give it the ability to be used as a sleeve if needed such as to allow the insertion of a steel post stiffener for gate hinge posts.

PLEASE NOTE: We are the distributor for Trex Fencing only. Our team is not able to answer questions about the railing components or systems. Please contact 800-289-8739 to speak directly to a Trex representative or contact your local decking and railing supplier. 

FAQ 140

If you are looking for railing posts and caps, here is a link to the Trex railing guide (see page 24). It gives nominal and actual measurements.

Can you use Trex for fencing?

Trex Fencing is the premier composite alternative to wood fencing.  Seclusions and Horizons systems are made specifically for fencing applications. The materials are not converted decking boards. They are specifically designed and engineered for fencing and will outperform other types of fences including wood and vinyl.

FAQ 141

Is Trex Fencing worth the cost?

When deciding if Trex Composite Fencing is worth the cost there are many factors to consider. Trex Fencing comes at a higher cost up-front when compared to wood and vinyl fence systems, because of it’s durability, natural beauty, flexibility in design, offered privacy, and its low maintenance. Material costs for a 6’H Trex Fence are about $55 per linear foot, gates excluded. If you are looking to have an installer put up your fence, you could be looking at anywhere from $75-95 per linear foot on average once you factor in labor costs. While the high price is a shock to many customers, they tend to discover that the amount of money saved in not having to repair, re-stain, and repaint their fence makes the cost of a Trex well worth it. Not to mention, you’ll get to relax in the summer months while your neighbors are spending Saturday mornings maintaining their fences.

FAQ 142

In addition to saving money and sweat equity in maintenance, there are also advantages in aesthetics, serenity, and natural beauty that you can’t necessarily put a price tag on. As the following pictures demonstrate, Trex adds to a landscape’s design and appeal in incredible ways.

FAQ 143

FAQ 144

FAQ 145Some fence materials can provide the beauty, others the durability, and others still the low-maintenance. But few materials can pull all three together quite like Trex Fencing. Not to mention, installation is relatively simple when compared to other fencing system. Trex is what you call a “stick-built” system, which means that the sections need to be assembled from individual components. But for all you amateur craftsmen out there, don’t let that scare you. Once your posts are in the ground, the pickets interlock using innovative “C channels”, and the top and bottom rails are bracketed onto the posts. The intuitive design makes installation a breeze.

FAQ 146

FAQ 147

FAQ 148

If you’d like to to do a deeper dive into the installation process, feel free to look through our videos and guides found in our Installation Resources: Seclusions | Horizons

So let’s circle back to the original question: Is Trex Fencing worth the cost? Understandably, Trex is not for everyone. Depending on your budget, how long you plan on living at your current home, and a variety of other factors, it may not make sense for you to go with Trex. But let’s break it down this way:

Are you wanting a beautiful fence without the maintenance?

Are you looking to minimize costs associated with repairs?

Are you planning on living at your current location for at least another 10 years?

Are you interested in a DIY product that you can be successfully completed in a few weekends?

Are you wanting to be supported by a team of “Trexperts” that can help you every step of the way — from ordering to installation (that’s us!)?

If you answered yes to these questions, then Trex is definitely worth the cost. In fact, just from a practical standpoint, a high-end wood fence tends to become more expensive than Trex in the long-run:

FAQ 149

Have more questions, or just need someone to talk to (about Trex, that is)? Then call our team at 877-700-8739. Looking for more information on how Trex Fencing stacks up to other products? Visit our comparison pages.

What is the best composite fence?

Since 2005, Trex has invented, defined and advanced composite fencing with a lineup of low-maintenance, high-performance products that fundamentally change the way we live outdoors. Many composite manufactures have come and gone over the years as Trex continues to grow and improve. Unlike other composite fence products that have only a stockade type or a tongue and groove type picket, Trex Fencing pickets are made with a unique interlocking design that prevent bowing and warping. This design also eliminates gaps, that are prevalent in other composite fences, that occur from contraction and expansion. Many composite manufactures produce a thin picket that can be used in place of a wood picket. However, few if any have produced a viable solution for a full composite fence system except for Trex. The Trex Fencing system has a stand alone, wind rated, composite fence post with post cap, a molded one piece top rail and interlocking pickets. Trex Fencing is the solution when it comes to composite fencing. Check out a more detailed comparison by clicking on Trex vs Other Composites.

FAQ 150

FAQ 151

Does Trex fencing flake?

Trex Fencing is not a painted surface, which means that it will not flake. Trex Fencing receives its color through a dying process during manufacturing, which means that you do not need to worry about ever repainting or restaining your fence throughout its lifetime. Additionally, you never need to worry about unsightly flaking that is often experienced with wood fencing.

FAQ 152To be honest, this is just the tip of the iceberg in regard to the benefits of Trex over wood. Vist Trex vs Wood for a more in-depth comparison of these two fencing materials.

Does vinyl or composite fencing last longer?

Vinyl fencing was introduced to the fencing industry as the long-lasting alternative to wood. By nature of its composition, plastic does not biodegrade, which means that a vinyl fence would theoretically last forever. The key word there is theoretically. Even though plastic lasts forever, its beauty certainly does not.

FAQ 153

The biggest problems you run into with vinyl fencing long-term concern the fences aesthetic and its durability. Plastic reacts negatively to sunlight, resulting in unsightly discoloring after enough exposure. White vinyl fencing, for example, will begin to fade to a yellowish color over time. Extreme temperatures – whether the heat or cold – affects the strength of the material over the years as well, resulting in the plastic becoming brittle. This promotes cracking, and the plastic will easily break when struck with rocks or some sort of blunt force.

How long a composite fence lasts depends on the quality, design, and installation of the brand. There are only a few manufacturers that have successfully designed a composite material that will last for at least a couple of decades. However, only one has designed a system that can also handle the requirements for durability in high winds, harsh heat and cold, and incidental contact that can cause damage. Trex introduced its fencing system in 2005, making it the fence with the longest track record. A Trex composite fence is expected to last at least 25 years without requiring any significant maintenance. It is a rot and insect resistant fence and is designed intelligently for longevity while also maintaining an elegant appearance.

FAQ 154

Sure, plastic will sit in a landfill for a hundred years, but Trex composite fencing is designed to maintain its aesthetic appeal with higher durability than most vinyl fencing for decades to come. Visit Trex vs Vinyl for a more in-depth comparison.

FAQ 155

Does wood or composite fencing last longer?

Composite fencing is designed to last longer than wood fencing. Composite fences are worth it if you are looking for a long-lasting alternative to wood fencing, a better looking and more durable alternative to vinyl fencing, or a fence that is easier to install and won’t crack like masonry, all while keeping the classic wood look. Although more expensive initially, a composite fence tends to be a less expensive option long-term once you factor in maintenance and the inevitability of replacement.

Trex Fencing, specifically, was designed to improve upon the advantages of composite fencing over wood. While wood fencing begins to depreciate the moment you put it in the ground, Trex composite fencing maintains it’s durability and beautiful design for at least 25 years.

FAQ 156

Wood fences usually are in dire straights by about 15 years, especially if you have not put the work and money into maintaining it. With virtually no maintenance required other than the occasional wash, Trex composite fencing is a long-term solution to the woes of wood fencing. Visit Trex vs Wood for a more in-depth comparison.

FAQ 157

How long does Trex fencing last?

Trex Fencing is built to last. With a 25-year residential warranty, you can feel confident that you will enjoy the durability and beauty of a Trex Fence for decades to come.

FAQ 158

What colors does Trex Fencing come in?

Trex Fencing is made in 3 rich colors, Woodland Brown, Saddle, and Winchester Grey.

FAQ 159

Woodland Brown looks like darkly stained wood and fades the least from its original color. It provides high contrast against lighter colors creating a defined border.

FAQ 160

Saddle fencing starts out dark tan and fades to a lighter tan, mimicking the color and tone of natural stained wood.

FAQ 161

Winchester Grey fencing will be a noticeably different color when new (typically a brownish/green color) and will weather to its intended color of light grey. Winchester Grey compliments the natural colors in brick or masonry, and can be attractive when used in modern urban design.

FAQ 162

Visit Trex Fencing Colors for more information.

Does Trex Fencing come in black?

Trex Fencing does not come in black. Our three colors available are Woodland Brown, Saddle, and Winchester Grey. Trex decided on which colors to produce their fencing materials in through extensive research and focus groups. The results of these efforts indicated that consumers were most interested in natural tones reflecting browns and stony hues. So while black is not currently offered within the Trex Fencing portfolio, there is the chance that additional colors will be added if research findings ever justify the change.

FAQ 163

For those customers who love Trex but also really want black, you do have the option of painting the fence system, although this will require maintenance in the future which may not be worth the extra effort and money. For more information, visit Trex Fencing Colors on our website.

Does Trex Fencing come in white?

Trex Fencing does not come in white. Our three colors available are Woodland Brown, Saddle, and Winchester Grey. Trex decided on which colors to produce their fencing materials in through extensive research and focus groups. The results of these efforts indicated that consumers were most interested in natural tones reflecting browns and stony hues. So while white is not currently offered within the Trex Fencing portfolio, there is the chance that additional colors will be added if research findings ever justify the change.

FAQ 164

For those customers who love Trex but also really want white, you do have the option of painting the fence system, although this will require maintenance in the future which may not be worth the extra effort and money. For more information, visit Trex Fencing Colors on our website.

Does Trex Fencing have a wood grain look?

Unlike Trex Decking, Trex Fencing does not have a wood grain look. The wood fibers in the material provide a natural wood aesthetic that sports a smooth finish that many customers love.

FAQ 165

Trex is the leader in composite fencing, and many people are surprised to find that the material is not 100% wood. Check out Trex vs Wood to see for yourself how Trex can give you all of the benefits of a wood fence without any of the drawbacks.

Is Trex Fencing made of the same material as Trex Decking?

Trex Fencing is not made of the same material as Trex Decking. While both are manufactured from a composite blend of wood fibers and plastic, Trex Decking encases their boards with a textured shell that gives the Decking a wood-grain look, whereas Trex Fencing does not have this shell and so sports more of a smooth finish.

FAQ 166FAQ 167FAQ 168

What is Trex Fencing goes into more detail concerning our product, and is a very helpful resource to learn more.

What are the Trex Fencing styles?

Trex Fencing comes in two separate styles: the Trex Seclusions and the Trex Horizons. Both styles provide full privacy fence system that is designed to last.

The Seclusions style provides a more classic look with a top rail, bottom rail and vertical pickets.

FAQ 169

The Horizons style provides a more modern look with a sleek steel frame and horizontal pickets.

FAQ 170

You can learn more about the Seclusions and Horizons styles on our website, https://www.trexfencingfds.com/

Installation and Customization

Could I install a Trex Fence myself, or do I need a professional to do it for me?

Trex Fencing is considered a DIY product, and we provide plenty of installation help every step of the way with videos, pdf’s, as well as our team of experts who can answer any questions you have during office hours. That being said, an installation of Trex Fencing does require you to have a certain level of comfortability with measuring, cutting, concrete mixing, post setting, and other basic construction skills. We highly recommend that you review the installation material and assess your ability to complete the project before purchasing Trex Fencing. If you decide to go the route of hiring a contractor, we can help with that process too!

FAQ 171

What is the easiest fence to install?

While there are various other fence systems out there that try to make installation easy, with our unique interlocking picket design, step-by-step instructions, videos, and a team of experts that you can call at every turn, Trex Fencing tries to take DIY to the next level. Visit our Installation Resources to review all of our install material. And remember, you don’t have to go-it-alone. Call our team at 877-700-8739 to talk to one of our technical experts. They can build you a quote, answer questions, help you order your material, as well as walk you through different installation scenarios. There are various other fence systems out there that try to make installation easy

FAQ 172

FAQ 173FAQ 174

How do I mount a Trex fence on top of concrete?

FAQ 175

Trex Fencing can be mounted on top of a concrete pad or retaining because the hollow post design allows the Trex post to sleeve over the top of an embedded component such as a heavy duty steel pipe or wall mount. Because the inside dimensions of Trex posts are 3-3/4” x 3-3/4”, the post can sleeve over preexisting mounts and anchored onto concrete.

There are several methodologies to mount Trex posts on top of concrete. Here are two concepts. Please note that these do not constitute official installation instructions from Trex or FDS. They are provided as guidelines. We encourage all customers to evaluate their installation needs to determine if the methods and applications you are planning to use will be viable options.

FAQ 176

We do offer concrete post mounts that serve their purpose well for our 6 foot high fences in most cases. But if you’re building a fence taller than 6 feet, or if you live in very windy areas, we do recommend using a mount that is designed to provide more stability.

FAQ 177

In cases where the concrete has not yet been poured, heavy duty pipe can be set into the concrete and used as towers for Trex posts. This method is generally more secure than anchored mounts because the concrete holds the pipe without the risk of anchors pulling loose.  Regardless of the mount method, you want the attachments to be sturdy and they need to fit the inside the dimensions of the Trex posts with some method of securing the post to the mount. If you have further questions, you can call our team of experts at 877-700-8739 and we would be happy to help you out.

Important note: Mounting a fence, Trex or otherwise, on top of concrete should be considered carefully. Ensure that your pad or wall are sufficient to support the fence. Anchors in a pad or on a narrow wall could break out with pressure from wind or other forces. If necessary, acquire engineering to determine if building a structure such as a privacy fence is a viable option for you.

This is an example of a poorly conceived project. In this case, the anchors for plated post mounts broke out the side of the concrete curbing after a post was mounted on top. 

FAQ 178

What preparations for a fence installation do I need to take?

Preparations for a fence installation include; consulting local codes and obtaining proper permits, thoroughly reviewing installation instructions, and making sure you have the necessary tools and equipment (skill saw, measuring tape, concrete, level, etc.). Obviously, there’s more to it than just starting to dig your holes.

FAQ 179You need to take the right preparations in order to ensure a successful install. At Trex Fencing, we provide Installation Resources that will guide you every step of the way, and we have a team of experts that can be reached during normal business hours MST at 877-700-8739. Other great resources to consult are your local fence installers. Some may even take charge of gathering some of the necessary paperwork. They will be able to let you know what needs to be done in your area.

Why are there black plates on the top rail of Seclusions gates?

The black end caps or T-plates that are attached to the sides of the top rails on the gates are place there to close off the open ends of the top rails. The plates are screwed in place for easy removal if necessary.

FAQ 180

Top Rail T-Plate with screw:FAQ 181

Trex Seclusions Top RailFAQ 182

What type of screw is used for Trex Seclusions Fence?

The type of screw used for #6 1-5/8″ wood exterior screw. There are four screws per bracket and four brackets per kit. Beyond these 16 screws, the same type of screw is used to attach the Trex Seclusions pickets to the posts and to attach the top rail to the Trex Seclusions brackets.?

What Parts Do I Need to Build a Trex Seclusions Fence?

The parts needed to build a Trex Selcusions Fence system are sold in three elements: posts, caps, and fence panel kits (although individual components can be bought separately). The fence panel kits are used to describe the pickets, rails, brackets and fasteners, although the components are not assembled when shipped.

The parts needed to build a Trex Seclusions Fence are:

 

    • Posts: The Trex post is universal. It is used for Seclusions and Horizons, and used for lines, ends, corners, and gates. Trex posts come in 8′, 9′, and 12′ lengths.

 

    • Post Caps: There are three styles. Flat top and pyramid are decorative composite caps. Crown caps are slim profile caps with a slight peak.

 

    • Rails: Seclusions has an aluminum bottom rail and a composite top rail. The aluminum bottom rail is hidden by sliding Trex composite covers over it.

 

    • Pickets: The interlocking pickets sit inside the bottom rail and are enclosed by the top rail.

 

  • Brackets and fasteners: There are four glass-filled nylon brackets that mount to the posts and support the rails.

A typical section of Seclusions includes the following:

FAQ 183

What sizes do Trex gates come in?

Trex gates come in two standard sizes: 46 1/4″ opening and a 65 1/2″ opening. if those standard options do not suit your needs, we can build custom sizes up to a 6 foot opening for a single gate or 12 foot opening for a double gate. Importantly, the max height we can build a gate to is 8 feet. If you are needing a gate any larger than that, then we can supply you with the composite material, but the gate frame and the hardware will have to be supplied somewhere else.

FAQ 184FAQ 185Visit Trex Gates for more details concerning dimensions and the advantages of our Trex Gates.

What material do I need to build Trex Horizons?

For Trex horizontal fencing with the Horizons fence system, you’ll need posts, post caps, Horizons frames with brackets and fasteners, and pickets. When you order Trex Fencing, we can supply all of the materials except the concrete. In fact, we make it easy for you on our Online Shop. We sell the fence sections in unassembled panel kits. The kits include all of the material in between the posts. You’ll need to know how many posts, post caps, and fence panel kits you want for your project. But don’t worry if you aren’t sure how material you need. If you’re still wanting some help with your order, you can always call our team at 877-700-8739. We are product experts that can help you every step of the way, including building quotes and answering questions about the product and installation.

FAQ 186FAQ 187FAQ 188

What can I put on my deck for privacy?

Trex Decking does not offer privacy railing, but that is another unexpected benefit of Trex Fencing. The fencing can be installed on a Trex deck to create privacy railing or screen solution that looks great.

FAQ 189

Installation is similar to if you were to install a line of fencing around your yard. The only difference is that you will need to sleeve the Trex posts over some sort of steel or wood mount. Fortunately, Trex posts are hollow, with the inside dimensions measuring at 3 3/4” x 3 3/4”, which makes sleeving the posts very easy. Our Installation Guides walk you through step-by-step, and we even have videos that many customers find helpful. Of course, if you need any assistance, you can call our team of experts at 877-700-8739 during regular business hours and we will be happy to assist.

What are the dimensions for a Trex fence post?

Our Trex posts are built for durability and strength. The outside dimension is 5″x5″ with an inside dimension of 3 3/4″ x 3 3/4″. The thickness of the Trex post is 5/8”, giving it the strength to be a stand-alone post despite the fact that it is hollow. Our posts come in 3 lengths: 8′, 9′, and 12′. Posts can be cut to various heights similar to lumber. Our Architectural Drawings are a great resource for all things related to dimensions. Individual components as well as fence sections are listed.

FAQ 190FAQ 191

To put things in perspective, check out how the thickness of a Trex post compares to a vinyl post. Yikes!

FAQ 192

What screws are used for Trex Fencing?

Screws used for Seclusions and Horizons are unique to each system.

SECLUSIONS

The fasteners used for the Seclusions fence kits are a green-colored #2 square head, #7 1-5/8″ epoxy-coated exterior screw. All fence kits include these fasteners. The placement of the Seclusions screws makes them virtually invisible to the casual observer.

There are 24 total screws used per 6-8′ tall section:

  • 4 brackets x 4 screws per bracket
  • 2 pickets attached to posts x 3 screws per picket
  • 1 top rail x 2 screws through the rail into the top bracket

FAQ 193

HORIZONS

The fasteners used for the Horizons fence kits are a #10 3/4″, #2 Phillips pan-head screw black oxide coated with a sealant. All fence kits include these fasteners. There are 54 total screws used per 6′ tall section. The placement of the Horizons screws makes them visible primarily on one side of the fence.

FAQ 194

What is deck skirting?

FAQ 195

Deck skirting is the material that fills the gap between your elevated deck and the ground beneath it.

Should a fence touch the ground?

Depending on the design, it is usually recommended that the fence not touch the ground. Trex Fencing recommends a width of around 3/8” between the ground and the bottom rail. While Trex is resistant to rot and so the moisture of the ground won’t adversely affect your fence, the trimmer line of a weed eater definitely would! So it is best to have at least some space in between your fence and the ground. Our Architectural Drawings go into more detail concerning measurements, and our Installation Guides will walk you through step-by-step how to make sure the fence gets installed correctly.

FAQ 196

What is the best way to install fence posts?

Installing Trex Fence posts is very similar to installing a wood fence post. Trex posts are self-supporting and do not need to be reinforced (with the exception of the hinge post for a gate) when installed up to eight-foot-tall. Installing fence posts usually entails digging a post hole and running a post string line along the first and last post to ensure that the line is straight. Once the posts are lowered into the holes, concrete is poured around them. The posts are adjusted to make sure they are plumb as the concrete sets.

FAQ 197

Trex posts won’t rot, so you can set them directly in the ground. For wood posts, however, you may want to consult some local professionals for ideas on how to protect your posts from rotting. Sometimes installers will lay gravel down underneath or add some sort of protective layer. If you need to mount the post on top of a pad or wall, the good news is the Trex posts are hollow so it is easy to sleeve them over steel or wood supports or embed them directly into the pad or wall.

FAQ 198

FAQ 199

Be sure to check the viability of the pad’s or wall’s capacity to support a fence and environmental pressure like the wind. View our installation tips for ideas on how to mount the posts on walls. For general instructions on how to install Trex fence posts, see our installation guides.

How do you build a fence on a hillside?

It is not uncommon that a costumer will need to be able to build a fence on a hillside. There are typically two methods to do so: following the ground (called sloping or racking) and stepping the fence down the hill. Most consumers prefer the sloping or racking method because it creates fence lines that match the slope of the hillside. In this practice, large gaps will not exist on one side of each section where there is a slope. The stepping method is a method that either has to be used because of the limitations of the materials or a preference for 90-degree angles and level horizontal lines. The disadvantage of a stepped fence is that it leaves gaps under the fence and, if the top of the fence is also stepping, gives varying privacy (one end of each section of the fence will be lower than the other end). Building a fence on a hillside does require some consideration of the materials needed and the method of installation. For materials, if you plan to slope, make sure you buy a fence product that has the ability to adjust to grade changes. A stick-built fence like Trex Seclusions easily adapts to slopes because the fence is assembled with brackets and rails that can be cut for angles. Trex also offers longer posts which is critical if you have a steep slope. If your post is not set deep enough, the footer will not be stable on the hillside and it’s possible it can be displaced with erosion or wind. If you do prefer a stepped fence, Trex Seclusions gives you that option as does Trex with Horizons, a horizontal fence system that uses Trex composite components with an exclusive frame from FDS Fence Distributors, the source for Trex Fencing. Visit our installation resource page for instructions on how to measure and cut materials to build a fence in a hillside.

FAQ 200FAQ 201

What are the details of our Trex Gates?

Our Trex gates come in two standard sizes and are made to order for each customer. Our gates perfectly match the fence and are made of the same composite material.

FAQ 202

FAQ 203

Our standard walk gates fit a 46.25” opening, and our standard large gates fit an opening of 65.5”. Of course, these two sizes can be used for double gates as well. Custom size gates can be built for an additional cost.

FAQ 204We do offer a couple of custom style gates, such as our sunburst gate pictured above. However, these styles are only available in our standard sizes. You can review our Architectural Drawings for more information regarding the dimensions of our gates.

What can I use for deck skirting?

To solve this solution, many homeowners elect to install skirting around the deck, usually out of wood boards to create an appealing barrier.

FAQ 205Of course, if you use wood to skirt your deck, you will need to factor in the time and cost to maintain the skirting’s beauty and function. If you’re using a composite material to build your deck, let’s say, oh I don’t know – Trex – for example, the last thing you’re looking for is probably maintenance.

Fortunately, this is yet another area where Trex Fencing really shines.

FAQ 206Trex Fencing offers full privacy to keep animals out from under your deck, as well as the wonderful low-maintenance qualities to compliment your composite deck. You will never need to paint or stain the fencing, and it can handle the elements much better than wood, or even vinyl, can.

Trex Pickets interlock, greatly decreasing the installation time when compared to wood as well.

FAQ 207

FAQ 208

What can I put on top of my fence for privacy?

You have a few options for what you can put on top of your fence to create some privacy. Many homeowners elect to install some sort of screen, lattice, or some other decorative piece in order to accomplish this. of course, depending on how much privacy you are wanting will determine what you install. Fortunately, with whatever you go with, Trex has options for you.

FAQ 209

Trex Lattices add a decorative touch to a fence while also obscuring the view for onlookers and passerbys. Trex Fencing is a full-privacy solution that is versatile and easily customizable. If you’re looking to completely secure the view into your property, Trex Fencing has you covered.

FAQ 210

Trex Fencing can be added as a topper to your fence, or you can use full sections of Trex Fencing to create a full-privacy perimeter. Our customers have gotten creative, and fortunately, Trex is versatile enough that you can do plenty of fun things with it. You can view our Gallery if you need some inspiration. Are you still wondering what exactly the benefits of Trex Fencing are? Then check our The Virtues of Trex Fencing.

How do you install Trex Fencing?

Trex Fencing is considered a DIY product, and thus is designed to be intuitive in how it is installed. More details for installing Trex Fencing can be found by referring to our Installation Resources, but the general idea is pretty simple. Below, we will walk you through a brief overview of how a section of Seclusions and Horizons fencing is installed. Keep in mind that this overview won’t include all of the specific measurements and cuts that may be required, but you should have a pretty good idea of how to install Trex by the time you’ve looked over this post.

First, let’s talk about Seclusions:

1.FAQ 211

Posts are installed first, similar to any fencing project. For a 6 foot high fence, we generally recommend burying our 9 foot posts at least 30 inches into the ground. Care should be taken to ensure that posts are level and evenly spaced. For reference, Trex Seclusions fence sections should be 8 feet (96”) wide on center of the posts. Concrete is used to secure the posts in place.

2. FAQ 212

Brackets are then installed on each posts (one on the top, one on the bottom). These will support the top and bottom rails.

3. FAQ 213

Our aluminum bottom rails provide strength to the fence to protect it from sagging. Composite bottom rail covers are sleeved over the aluminum, and the rail is then placed over the bottom brackets.

4. FAQ 214

The first and last pickets are screwed to the posts, and then the rest of the pickets interlock together to finish the section.

5. FAQ 215

The top rail is then cut to length and secured over the pickets.

6. FAQ 216

Post caps are then installed. We offer three designs; Flat cap, Pyramid cap, or Crown cap.

Hopefully that was straight-forward enough. Now, let’s move on to installing Horizons.

1. FAQ 217

Your fence posts will be buried exactly the same way you would for Seclusions.

2. FAQ 218

Brackets will be screwed into the top of the posts, (Note: this is different than the Seclusions fencing that requires a bracket on the top and and the bottom).

3. FAQ 219

Hang the top horizontal rail from the brackets.

4. FAQ 220

Screw in the back vertical rails, keeping them flush with the posts.

5. FAQ 221

Hang the first picket onto the top rail, and then hang the rest of them on down, stopping right before you ang the last picket.

6. FAQ 222

Slide the bottom rail over the last picket, and then hang the picket.

7. FAQ 223

Screw in the vertical front rails, and securely insert any remaining screws to secure the metal frame.

8. FAQ 224

Install your post caps and there you have it! One section of Trex Horizons Fencing ready to go.

Depending on your level of experience, you may be feeling either really confident after reading this post, or you may still be feeling a bit overwhelmed at the idea of installing your fence. Keep in mind that our team is here and ready to help you every step of the way. Also keep in mind that you probably have fencers in your area that are willing to install your project for you. If you would like some help finding a contractor in your area, then give our team a call at 877-700-8739 and we will be more than willing to help you get connected with someone.

Is the Trex gate hardware customizable?

While standard Trex gate hardware is not customizable, it is adjustable. Hinges can be adjusted for opening sizes and latches can be swapped out for third party key latches, for example. So, while the Trex gate hardware isn’t customizable, consumers do have some flexibility. Learn more about our gates and accompanying hardware.

FAQ 225

How do you install a Trex Fence post?

Installing Trex Fence posts is very similar to installing a wood fence post. Trex posts are self-supporting and do not need to be reinforced (with the exception of the hinge post for a gate) when installed up to eight-foot-tall. Trex posts won’t rot, so you can set them directly in the ground.

FAQ 226

As per our Installation Guide, your post spacing should be determined by driving stakes into the ground and running a string along your property line, checking every now and then to make sure the string remains straight. Using spray paint, mark the location of each post, measuring in between each mark to ensure that posts are set 96” apart on center (for Seclusions) or 97” apart on center (for Horizons).

Once post placement has been marked, you can begin digging your holes. Post holes should be dug to approximately 12” in diameter and at least 30” deep. The depth of your hole will depend upon local codes and frost lines. Place the post in the hole and use a level to ensure that the post is plumb (vertical) and level. Use the string line as a reference, but be careful not to press against the string with the post. Once the post is level, add in the concrete and secure it until the concrete is cured.

FAQ 227

If you need to mount the post on top of a pad or wall, the good news is the Trex posts are hollow so it is easy to sleeve them over steel or wood supports or embed them directly into the pad or wall. Two of the most common ways of accomplishing this are outlined in the following graphics.

FAQ 228

FAQ 229

Be sure to check the viability of the pad’s or wall’s capacity to support a fence and environmental pressure like the wind. When it comes to installation, we strongly recommend reviewing the Installation Resources for the most in-depth information. And then, of course, call our team at 877-700-8739 if you have any additional questions.

How do you put a fence down a slope?

It is not uncommon that a costumer will need to be able to build a fence down a slope. There are typically two methods to do so: following the ground (called sloping or racking) and stepping the fence down the hill. Most consumers prefer the sloping or racking method because it creates fence lines that match the slope of the hillside. In this practice, large gaps will not exist on one side of each section where there is a slope. The stepping method is a method that either has to be used because of the limitations of the materials or a preference for 90-degree angles and level horizontal lines. The disadvantage of a stepped fence is that it leaves gaps under the fence and, if the top of the fence is also stepping, gives varying privacy (one end of each section of the fence will be lower than the other end). Building a fence on a hillside does require some consideration of the materials needed and the method of installation. For materials, if you plan to slope, make sure you buy a fence product that has the ability to adjust to grade changes. A stick-built fence like Trex Seclusions easily adapts to slopes because the fence is assembled with brackets and rails that can be cut for angles. Trex also offers longer posts which is critical if you have a steep slope. If your post is not set deep enough, the footer will not be stable on the hillside and it’s possible it can be displaced with erosion or wind. If you do prefer a stepped fence, Trex Seclusions gives you that option as does Trex with Horizons, a horizontal fence system that uses Trex composite components with an exclusive frame from FDS Fence Distributors, the source for Trex Fencing. Visit our installation resource page for instructions on how to measure and cut materials to build a fence in a hillside.

FAQ 230FAQ 231

How do you build an 8 foot Trex fence?

Trex Fencing is specifically designed to build to any height up to 12 feet tall, so building an 8-foot fence is possible. The standard lengths of the Trex material make it even easier to install the fence at 6 foot and 8 foot tall without cutting the pickets and posts. If they do need to be cut, the posts, rails, and pickets are extruded composite lumber components and can be cut like wood. To build an 8-foot tall fence, set posts to the proper depth in concrete to ensure they can support the fence and keep it from getting displaced in the wind. The minimum depth for an 8-foot tall fence is 36″, although it is highly recommended that you check local building codes, soil conditions, and local installation practices to verify the proper depth. For example, if your frostline is lower than 36″, you will need to set your posts deeper to ensure your footer does not get displaced. Once the posts are set, your rails and pickets can be installed per the installation guides using the brackets and fasteners provided by FDS Fence Distributors, the source for Trex Fencing.

FAQ 232

How do you strengthen a Trex fence?

Trex fences that are installed properly have tremendous strength. They are able to withstand high winds and incidental contact that might otherwise damage other fence materials. If the fence needs to be strengthened even further, there are several methods. The posts are made of a thick, durable composite so they do not require reinforcement except for the hinge side of a gate. Because they are hollow, the posts can be stiffened with a 3-1/2″ x 3-1/2″ steel post placed inside. Each section of the Trex fence contains four brackets with four screws per bracket, so the performance of the attachments is already very strong. However, to strengthen the rail attachment, you can use screws with a higher sheer strength (the standard screw is #7 wood exterior screw) such as a stainless (marine grade) screw or an aircraft-grade screw. Shortening the span between the posts will also increase strength and adding a bottom rail as a mid-rail will also add tremendous strength. Our install guides can offer more details on general installation of Trex Fencing.

FAQ 233

How do you make an easy patio privacy screen?

Many customers are looking for ways to add a little privacy to their back yard, especially around their patio. Trex Fencing’s full privacy design makes it a great option for a privacy screen. Our  installation resources offer step-by-step instructions for installing Trex Fencing. The same principles will apply for building a screen around your patio, the only difference is that you will most likely be needing to mount your posts on the deck or patio rather than burying them into the ground. Because Trex posts are hollow, you can sleeve them over a steel or wood mount and secure them to the surface. From there, the fence sections go up using brackets to mount the top and bottom rails, and the pickets interlock across the whole section to create the full-privacy look. Our team of technical experts can be reached at 877-700-8739 if you need any assistance.

FAQ 234

1.FAQ 235Posts are installed first, similar to any fencing project. For a 6 foot high fence, we generally recommend burying our 9 foot posts at least 30 inches into the ground. Care should be taken to ensure that posts are level and evenly spaced. For reference, Trex Seclusions fence sections should be 8 feet wide on center of the posts. Concrete is used to secure the posts in place.

2. FAQ 236Brackets are then installed on each posts (one on the top, one on the bottom). These will support the top and bottom rails.

3. FAQ 237Our aluminum bottom rails provide strength to the fence to protect it from sagging. Composite bottom rail covers are sleeved over the aluminum, and the rail is then placed over the bottom brackets.

4. FAQ 238The first and last pickets are screwed to the posts, and then the rest of the pickets interlock together to finish the section.

5. FAQ 239The top rail is then cut to length and secured over the pickets.

6. FAQ 240Post caps are then installed. We offer three designs; Flat cap, Pyramid cap, or Crown cap.

As easy as that, you can install a privacy screen that will look great and serve its function superbly for years to come.

How do you install a horizontal fence on a slope?

FAQ 241

While many horizontal fences can be installed on a slope, consider that one of the design attributes of a horizontal fence is to provide a leveled appearance and a continuation of landscaping with a nod towards the Earth’s horizon. In contemporary architecture, horizontal fences follow the concept of “clean lines” which evoke a sense of space and simplicity. Having said that, personal preferences towards horizontally flowing lines that follow the slope of the ground may be more appealing than staying parallel to the Earth’s horizon. In either case, a component-built fence can easily be adapted to install a horizontal fence on a slope. For example, Trex with the Horizons fence system can be built on a slope by cutting the pickets and horizontal rails. The most efficient approach is to set up a jig on sawhorses so you can cut all of the pickets per section at the same angle.  The top and bottom frame rails will need to be cut on the appropriate angle and should be touched up with rust-inhibiting black matte paint.

FAQ 242

How do you build a fence on uneven ground?

Building a fence on uneven ground can get tricky, which is why Trex Seclusions is designed to be very adaptable. Additionally, our installation guides offer resources on how to handle tricky terrain, such as slopes. Essentially, you will want to space out the posts so that they are set at the point of grade change in the landscape. Once posts are set, rails and pickets will need to be cut at the correct angle so that they follow the contour of the terrain. We also provide longer posts and pickets so if you want to keep your top line level but follow the ground at the bottom rail, you can adjust each section. Our install guides provide more detail, but you can also call our team of experts and we will be happy to help you out.

FAQ 243FAQ 244

Do I have to cut or trim the fence material?

It may be necessary to cut the Trex composite fence material to get the actual length you need to build the fence. The actual lengths of the Trex composite components may vary from the nominal lengths. This is due to expansion and contraction of the material during production. To compensate for possible variation in length, Trex overruns a component before cutting it during the extrusion process. That may add to the length of the component by as much 2″, although the typical overrun is less than an inch.

The nominal lengths for Trex materials are as follows:

Trex Posts:

 

  • 96″, 108″, and 144″

Trex Pickets:

 

    • 67″ (For Seclusions: used as vertical pickets for 6′ tall Seclusions fence panels; can be used for 6′ wide on center as bottom rail covers / For Horizons: used as horizontal pickets for 6′ wide on center (actual width of a Horizons fence panel is one inch wider than Seclusions))

 

  • 91″ (used as vertical pickets for 8′ tall Seclusions fence panels and bottom rail covers for 8′ wide on center for any fence height / For Horizons: used as horizontal pickets for 8′ wide on center (actual width of a Horizons fence panel is one inch wider than Seclusions))

Trex Top Rails:

 

  • 91″

FAQ 245

How do you build a horizontal fence gate?

To build a horizontal fence gate, you will need pickets, framing, and hardware. Depending on the material you use, your frame should be sturdy enough to support the pickets and maintain its rigidity. If you are considering Trex composite pickets, you can build your horizontal fence gate by using U-channel steel or aluminum into which the pickets can be secured with fasteners. You may have to reinforce the gate with additional cross framing if it is larger than a normal walk gate. Alternatively, you can buy pre-built Trex horizontal gates from FDS Fence Distributors. Rather than building your own horizontal fence gate, FDS can create a sleek, fully private fence gate made from Trex composite components and a powder-coated black frame. The gate has the same look on both sides and comes with accompanying hardware.

FAQ 246

You can learn more about our Trex gates on our website.

How do I put privacy around my hot tub?

Many customers are looking for ways to add a little privacy to their back yard, especially around their hot tub. Trex Fencing’s full privacy design makes it a great option for a privacy screen. Our installation resources offer step-by-step instructions for installing Trex Fencing. The same principles will apply for building a screen around your hot tub, the only difference is that you will most likely be needing to mount your posts on the deck or patio rather than burying them into the ground. Because Trex posts are hollow, you can sleeve them over a steel or wood mount and secure them to the surface. From there, the fence sections go up using brackets to mount the top and bottom rails, and the pickets interlock across the whole section to create the full-privacy look. Our team of technical experts can be reached at 877-700-8739 if you need any assistance.i

FAQ 247

How do you build a composite fence?

Building a composite fence depends on the brand and components used. To build a composite fence, you will first need to research what product will work best for your property. Some composite manufacturers only sell pickets so you will need to install them with wood or metal posts and rails. In these scenarios, you will typically put up your posts and rails and then fasten the composite pickets to the rails with screws or nails recommended by the manufacturer. There are few composite fences that are full systems. The most well-known brand and the one with the longest track record is Trex. The Trex fencing system uses composite components that are extruded specifically to create an integrated fence. To build a composite fence using Trex components, purchase materials through FDS Fence Distributors or one of its outlets, and follow the installation guides . The fence is logically designed and easy to build. It does not require special tools and most weekend warriors and contractors find it just as easy as building a wood or vinyl fence.

FAQ 248

How do I build a Trex picket fence?

Trex does not manufacture a picket fence design, but rather a full privacy system with unique interlocking pickets.

FAQ 249

FAQ 250While customers have purchased individual Trex pickets in order to customize their own design, Trex does not offer any other design other than our full-privacy fence.

FAQ 251Keep in mind that Trex pickets sport a “C” channel design, and thus may not be what you are needing if you are wanting a picket fence. It all depends on the look you are going for. if you are not absolutely sold on the idea of a picket fence, then we would love to introduce you to the benefits of Trex’s revolutionary full-privacy system. The Benefits and Virtues of Trex Fencing include a picture frame look with a board-on-board design, and incredibly low maintenance compared to wood fencing. Trex’s durability far surpasses that of vinyl, and can even hold up great during hurricane-force winds.

FAQ 252If you’re curiosity has been piqued, then check out Trex vs Other Products, or continue to type your questions in the search. Our team of experts is also available during normal business hours 8am-5pm, Monday-Friday, MST. They can help answer any questions you have.

How do I make my pickets interlock if the sections are more narrow than 8'?

Trex is sold in 8 foot wide sections, but the nature of the composite material allows you to cut the fence components like regular lumber. Because of this, 6 foot sections can be constructed if desired, or any section less than 8 feet wide for that matter. Many customers cut their sections back in order to fit spaces that just would not work for a full 8 foot section.

FAQ 253

FAQ 254

Situations in which you would be shortening the span of the fence would require you to cut top and bottom rails to length, and then you would remove the needed amount of pickets from the section. Importantly, you would not want to cut, or “rip”, the pickets in order to fit the shortened span. That would ruin the interlocking function and would cause problems in securing your fence section. Instead, you will need to adjust the spacing of the pickets accordingly. While this will affect how tight a few of the pickets are interlocked together, you can place finish nails through the knuckles of the pickets in order to secure them.

FAQ 255

Pages 12 and 13 of our Installation Guide shows you how to do this. Our Installation Resources include videos that give you a visual of how a fence section goes up which may also be very helpful.

How do you run a fence string line?

Typically, to run a string line you already have installed your first and last fence posts. Begin the stringing process by measuring up on the first and last fence posts to the point where you want your top rail to attach. Once you’ve identified that placement, fasten a small screw or nail to the post on both ends, then secure the string to the screws. Be sure the string is pulled tight so it doesn’t drop down the fence line. Set the remainder of your posts and plumb them as needed before the concrete in the post hole cures. Usually, you’ll want line posts to touch but not deflect the string line otherwise your posts won’t line up after the concrete is dry. Setting posts properly isn’t hard, but it does take time and patience to make sure they are plumb and flush with the fence line. Step back far enough to look at the string line and see if you like how the top line of your fence will look. If there are any transitions in your property grade, you may want to measure up applicable line posts and attach additional screws. Move the string line so the screw acts as another contact point to alter the angle of the line. Step back several times and get a good view of the string line and make any additional adjustments before finalizing the measurements for the rest of your brackets based on the location of the string. View our installation resources for more help installing your fence.

FAQ 256

Do you need to leave a gap between fence boards?

Gaps between fence boards may be necessary if the boards are anticipated to swell or expand. With wood fences, boards will actually shrink as they weather because moisture evaporates out of the boards. So, gaps typically aren’t necessary for wood fences, but if gaps aren’t desirable in the first place, the consumer may not have a choice since gaps will inevitably appear overtime on a wood fence. Composite fence boards act differently because they are dense and won’t dry out as they age. That’s why composite fence boards that are butted together tend to bulge and warp when the fence material heats up in the sun. If you prefer a composite fence system, choose Trex. The fence boards are specifically designed to avoid the need for gaps while still maintaining full privacy as the boards expand and contract. Trex is also a better option for wood fence boards if you want to avoid gaps altogether.

FAQ 257
FAQ 258Visit our article about Trex’s Smart Design to learn more about the benefits of our Trex pickets.

How do I create a privacy screen?

With Trex Fencing, you can create a privacy screen in your backyard with the right tools and some basic skills in measuring, cutting, and construction. Trex Fencing provides a full-privacy design added with an elegant and natural look to your screen.

FAQ 259FAQ 260

Our Installation Resources, combined with our team of experts, are here to help you from start to finish. You can call us 877-700-8739 during normal business hours Monday-Friday.

How do I attach Trex Fencing to my deck?

It is easy to attach Trex posts to a deck if your application calls for it. Trex Fencing Posts are versatile components that can be used interchangeably as a standalone support or a sleeve over another support. This is particularly useful if you are using a Trex Fence as privacy railing or privacy screens. Trex Fencing posts can be sleeved over pressure-treated 4×4 wood railing posts that have already been attached to the frame of the deck. The Trex posts have a thick wall, but they are hollow. The internal dimension of the post cavity is 3-3/4″x3-3/4″ so they will fit over a standard 4×4 wood post (typically milled to 3-1/2″x3-1/2″).

For specifics on how to attach support posts for railing to a deck or how to install other types of mounts, download the Trex installation guide: https://documents.trex.com/is/content/Trex/full-trex-installation-guide-2019pdf.pdf .  Section 5 contains details about various post mounts. There are no specific instructions for the installation of a Trex  fence post as a sleeve. However, the installer simply needs to ensure the Trex posts are secured over the internal support post in a proper fashion. For example, if installing Trex Seclusions, attach the brackets to the posts with proper screws to fasten into the support inside. If the support post inside the Trex post is wood, attach the Trex Seclusions brackets to the post with 1-5/8″ wood exterior screws or similar. The screws will go through the 5/8″ thick Trex post wall into the wood support post. If the Trex fence post is sleeving over a metal post mount, use self-tapping screws to go through the Trex composite and into the metal inside.
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Do the posts have to be reinforced?

Trex posts are immensely strong and do not need to be reinforced in normal situations. For example, a 6 foot or even 8 tall Trex fence does not need to be reinforced. The posts can be placed directly in the ground in concrete just like a wood post.

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We get this question a lot from customers because the hollow design of the Trex posts remind them of vinyl posts that require inserts in order to reinforce them. A Trex post, however, is a completely different animal.

FAQ 263Trex posts sport a 5/8” thick wall, which is over 4x thicker than traditional vinyl posts. With vinyl posts, it is not uncommon for rocks or other debris to smash and crack the material, making your fence look less than stellar.

FAQ 264Trex posts, on the other hand, can take a beating. And not only that, but the posts look beautiful with their wood aesthetic.

FAQ 265

There are some some scenarios in which we would recommend reinforcing the post, and these have to do with instances in which the posts will be bearing a heavier weight than is typical. For example, we strongly recommend steel post inserts to reinforce the hinge post. This helps to stabilize the gate for long term usage.

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Without the reinforced steel, the gate would end up tearing through the composite material.

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While most customers desire fencing that is 6′ to 8′ high, there are some instances in which customers want to build a fence that is taller. These requests are common for industrial or commercial properties.

FAQ 269For any fence material, you will need to provide some sort of additional reinforcement if the fence gets much higher than 8 feet. This is because the material becomes increasingly top heavy the higher it sticks up out of the ground, and wind has a much easier time toppling over the fence (think back on your childhood days when you tried to see how tall you could stack your Legos). For these instances, we strongly recommend steel inserts within the posts. Configurations for these fence designs are available in our Shop Drawings.

Do I have to set Trex posts in concrete?

If you are setting your Trex posts in the ground, it is best to set them in concrete. Soil is not heavy enough to keep a post from shifting with winds and other lateral pressure. It is also unstable enough that with expansion and contraction, soil will heave or settle which will put the posts out of plumb.

Follow local building code and soil conditions for best practices in setting posts in a concrete footer. In general, a Trex post should be set to a depth of 30″ in a 12″ wide concrete footer when building a 6′ tall fence (and deeper if building a taller fence). A typical footer can be set using post mix and will usually take 2 bags of 80 lb post mix per hole. You can set a Trex post directly into the hole and surround it with concrete. There is no need to wrap the bottom of the post, although it is sometimes a good idea to do so if you are concerned about concrete spatter or dust on the post.

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How do I build a privacy fence gate?

With Trex, the gates come pre-assembled, and so there is no need to build them yourself. Our Trex gates come in two standard sizes and are made to order for each customer. Our gates perfectly match the fence and are made of the same composite material.

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Our standard walk gates fit a 46.25” opening, and our standard large gates fit an opening of 65.5”. Of course, these two sizes can be used for double gates as well. Custom size gates can be built for an additional cost.

FAQ 273We do offer a couple of custom style gates, such as our sunburst gate pictured above. However, these styles are only available in our standard sizes. You can review our Architectural Drawings for more information regarding the dimensions of our gates.

Can I build a section wider than 8 ft on center?

The standard maximum width of a Trex Seclusions fence section is 96″ on center (the center of post to the center of the next post), which makes the span between posts 91″ nominal. It is always best to follow the standard installation guidelines, but if you need to (or have accidentally) set your posts further part, the method described in this link will help you adapt to the extra width. Using a combination of bands to cover seams and steel tubes to create longer internal rails, you can join pieces of Trex railing for extra width. For more details, download the instructions on how to create longer sections.

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How far apart should I space my Trex posts?

When figuring out how far apart you should space your Trex posts you need to take into account whether you are doing a Seclusions Fence or a Horizons Fence. Trex Seclusions Fence panels are designed to be 96′ wide on the center of the post. Because of this, it is important that when installing, Trex Seclusions posts are 91″ apart from inside post to inside post. Trex Horizons Fence panels are designed to be 97″ wide on the center of the post. Because of this, it is important that when installing Trex Horizons, posts are to be 92″ apart from inside post to inside post.

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Many customers cut their sections back in order to fit spaces that just would not work for a full 8 foot section.

FAQ 276Situations in which you would be shortening the span of the fence would require you to cut top and bottom rails to length, and then you would remove the needed amount of pickets from the section. Importantly, you would not want to cut, or “rip”, the pickets in order to fit the shortened span. That would ruin the interlocking function and would cause problems in securing your fence section. Instead, you will need to adjust the spacing of the pickets accordingly. While this will affect how tight a few of the pickets are interlocked together, you can place finish nails through the knuckles of the pickets in order to secure them.

FAQ 277Pages 12 and 13 of our Installation Guide shows you how to do this. Our Installation Resources include videos that give you a visual of how a fence section goes up which may also be very helpful.

Our install guides for both our Seclusions and Horizons fence systems offer step-by-step instructions to ensure that your posts get installed correctly.

Do I need rebar inside my post?

In most situations, you do not need rebar for a Trex post footer. A post footer is a small monolithic pour that fills up a post hole. Adding rebar isn’t usually needed for these type of footers. In a rare case, you may want to put concrete or grout inside the cavity of the post (perhaps to make the base more rigid, for example). If so, rebar can help to stabilize the internal concrete so it does not crack inside the post. Here is an example of how rebar could be used inside the post. Please note, it is not recommended that concrete extend very far up the post outside of the ground. Concrete can swell and could potentially split the post. While there are no specification recommendations, you would typically want to limit the concrete to no more than 1/3 of the post height. Using concrete inside of a post could void the warranty.

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How do I figure how much material I need for my fence?

Figuring or calculating your materials isn’t hard if you understand the basics of how to create a layout and use your measurements. With any fence, including Trex, the general principle of figuring out how many posts, rails, pickets, etc., is as follows:

A “section” of fence is defined as a post (and cap) and all of the materials you need before the next post. With Trex, it’s easy, we sell materials as unassembled “kits” so everything you need between the posts is included.

Here are two images that will give you instructions on how to figure how much material you need for your property.

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Can I use a Trex post as a sleeve?

Unlike wood fence posts, Trex is hollow in the center and has a wide enough dimension to use the Trex post as a sleeve. The post is designed to be a self-supporting component so it wouldn’t be necessary to reinforce them, except where applicable*, but the hollow post allows it to be used interchangeably as a sleeve.

A Trex post has an outer dimension of 5″ x 5″ with a 5/8″ wall. The inner dimension is 3-3/4″ x 3-3/4″ which is wide enough to allow the Trex post to sleeve over most nominal 4″ x 4″ posts or a steel pole. This design gives a consumer a lot of options for installation. A Trex post can sleeve over a pressure treated wood post on a deck which would then allow a builder to cut the panel kit components to create a privacy railing or screen. A Trex post could be sleeved over galvanized steel posts embedded into a concrete wall or pad so the fence would be built on top without having to core out a hole for the post. A Trex post could be sleeved over a 4×4 structural support post for a deck before the deck is built to provide a much more attractive and thicker looking post than the wood inside. NOTE: Trex Fencing posts are not the same as railing posts. The components are not compatible with each other. Search for article on railing sleeves.

Learn more about Trex Fencing posts.

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* Trex posts used to mount hinges for a gate require a steel post stiffener. Gates made from Trex composite components are heavy and because they move, there is significant torque on the posts used to attach hinges. Additionally, stiffeners are necessary for fences over 8′ tall to extend the depth of the post hole sufficiently to support a tall fence.

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Do you have post skirts?

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Trex Fencing posts are different than Trex railing posts. Just like the Trex Fencing system, the Trex railing system has its own complementary components including skirts for post bases. While skirts are not manufactured for Trex Fencing posts (fences in general don’t use skirts), Trex Fencing caps can be modified to create skirts. Using a plunge router or jigsaw, cut out the top of the mold to create a 5×5 hole. Flip it upside down before placing it. This will allow the modified cap to slide down over the post and rest at the base with the widest part of the new cap sitting on the surface as a skirt.

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Maintenance and Repairs

How do you clean a Trex fence?

Typical cleaning of a dirty Trex fence usually only requires using a bucket of soapy water, a soft bristle brush, and a hose. The dirt usually comes off easily and the fence looks fantastic after the cleaning. Some foreign materials such as graffiti or sap may take more effort to clean. Importantly, we do not recommend pressure washing the fence as that will likely damage the fence. Consult the Trex Fencing Care and Cleaning guide for more advice on cleaning a dirty fence.

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How do I clean sap off my fence?

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How do I fix warping boards on my gate?

It is not uncommon for any gate, regardless of material, to require some attention as it ages. This is true of Trex as well. Sometimes, expansion and contraction due to temperature and humidity changes can occur and the boards on the gate may warp the bottom fascia board or the uprights on the edges of the gate. This can be improved by using screws to create additional contact points to flatten the boards.

Trex does not manufacture gate-specific parts so pickets are adapted to make the necessary components to create a finished look. The adaptations are designed to take the best advantage of the Trex material to make a gate that closely matches the look of the fence. You may notice that the bottom piece requires notching and ripping the material to get it as close to flush with the uprights as possible. Taking off the curled edge of a picket creates a piece flat enough to use as fascia. The compromise is that the thin material is more likely to flex.

If the fascia or uprights are warping, attach fasteners at the edge of the pickets so they go through the most material. If possible, it would be best to clamp the rail or upright first, then add screws. Use a #7×1-5/8″ Square Drive Trimhead Screw. These screws have very small heads but if you want to reduce their visibility, dab a small amount of paint on the head. This may not be necessary if you sink the head just below the surface. The material that is displaced by the screw can be pinched together and tapped lightly with a hammer to cover up the screw head and flatten the area where the screw was attached.

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Will Trex fencing rot?

Trex Fencing is backed by a 25-year residential warranty that protects customers from woes such as rotting, twisting, and insect damage. Trex Fencing is designed in such a way with recycled plastic that it is guaranteed to not rot. Just one of the many advantages Trex Fencing has over wood!

FAQ 287

Will vines grow on a Trex Fence?

Since Trex Fencing has a porous surface, the vines can cling to the material and potentially cause damage if not maintained. That’s a conundrum for homeowners who like the rustic look of vine growth but don’t want to damage their property. Great news is that Trex Fencing is highly versatile, and customers have been able to create fun and beautiful customizations to spare their fence the wear and tear that vines impose.

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You even have the option to hang a trellis on the fence itself and let the vine climb up it rather than the composite material. It’s ultimately up the the customer to decide how they want to maintain the plant growth in their yard, it sure is nice to know that Trex Fencing can be used to tie your vegetation and perimeter barrier together.

Will Trex Fencing burn?

Trex Fencing has a Class B fire rating. In short, it won’t aid in spreading the fire, but fire will damage it. For more information regarding fire rating and other general technical data, visit our Technical Resources.

Will the snow or hail damage Trex?

Trex Fencing material is very durable. Snow and hail will typically not negatively affect the fence. Like most surfaces, hail can leave marks on the material but is not sufficiently powerful enough to break the Trex product.

Will bleach hurt Trex fencing?

Use of products containing bleach or oxalic/phosphoric acid will lighten the surface of Trex®. Use the product in an inconspicuous area to determine if the effect achieves the results you want. Neither product will affect the structural integrity of Trex Fencing. Keep in mind, though, that in many cases, using bleach to clean your Trex Fence is not necessary. Hot soapy water and a soft bristle brush can oftentimes do the trick just fine. Consult our Trex Fencing Care & Cleaning Guide for more information concerning different cleaning recommendations.

Will composite fencing rot?

One of the sad realities of wood fencing is that, for all its natural beauty, it will eventually begin to rot.

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That is why many people have turned to alternatives to wood, such as vinyl or masonry. As effective as those alternatives are, many customers are disappointed because they desire the natural aesthetic that wood provides. In order to fill that niche, composite fencing was produced, combining natural beauty with low maintenance.

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While composite fencing sports greater durability compared to wood, it was still by no means the perfect alternative. Many types of composite systems require wood inserts or rails. So while the composite material itself won’t rot, the other aspects of the fence will be susceptible. Another big issue was that even though composite fencing was lower maintenance, you could still count on the pickets bowing, expanding, and contracting.

That is where Trex Fencing comes in. In the early 2000’s, vinyl and wood fencing were flourishing in our market. However, there was not a product that was durable, low maintenance, and also beautiful and functional. We worked hand in hand with Trex’s R&D department creating a composite fence that mimicked the look and strength of our most popular wood fence style at that time, only now with a material that would not rot, split, need painting or staining and could withstand extreme climates. With our expertise in fencing and Trex’s expertise in manufacturing, it was the perfect partnership for creating a fence product that was sure to be successful.

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Our 25-year warranty includes rotting as well as other traditional woes of wood fencing; splitting, twisting, and insect damage. Trex offers a revolutionary take on composite fencing. Visit the Benefits & Virtues of Trex Fencing to gain a better understanding of how Trex can beautify your property and simplify your life!

Will fence posts rot in concrete?

Rotting posts have haunted homeowners since the beginning of fencing. The moment that you put a wood post in the ground, it begins reacting to the moisture and soil surrounding it. Concrete around the posts provides some level of protection, but water from rainfall or your sprinklers eventually find their way to the bottom of your post through absorption. What’s worse is that rotten posts are by far the biggest pain when it comes to fence maintenance. It requires you to disassemble the fence sections on either side of the post and then work to pull the post up from the ground, concrete and all. Once the new post is set, you need to reassemble the sections.

There are measures you can take to decrease the rate at which wood posts decay, or you can go with alternative materials that won’t rot, such as vinyl fencing or masonry. This is disappointing for many homeowners, however, who really like the natural beauty of wood. Not to mention, there are other issues that you’ll end up running into.

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Trex offers a wonderful solution for these homeowners. Trex looks incredibly like wood, but the composite nature of the material protects it from rotting. In fact, Trex’s 25 year warranty covers rotting, so you can have peace of mind that when you put a Trex post in the ground it is there to stay.

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Even customers who can’t afford the entire fence system can use Trex posts for their fence line. The wood rails and pickets can be attached to the Trex posts no differently than wood posts, except now you don’t have to worry about replacing rotten posts in 10-15 years. The Trex posts can even be painted or stained to match the color of your fence. For a bit of an increase in price, you get the peace of mind that comes from Trex composite posts.

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Of course, there are benefits of Trex’s entire composite fence system that you can’t get by using the Trex posts alone. Many customers are scared by the high price tag, but they end up finding that the low maintenance, the ease of installation, and the durability of the product are well worth the cost. Trex brings the best qualities of other fence materials and builds upon them to offer a truly exceptional fence.

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Whether your interested in the full system or just the posts, visit our Online Shop to view prices and order materials, or call our team of experts at 877-700-8739 to ask them any questions you might have.

Will composite fencing burn?

Fire will damage composite fencing, though since plastic is a major component in composite options, it will more likely melt. Trex Fencing has a Class B Fire rating. In short, it won’t aid in spreading the fire, but fire will damage itAs a matter of practice, composite fencing should not be burned. Composites contain plastics, organic materials, adhesives, and pigmentation which can cause irritation if inhaled. Composites are not a good source of fuel and should be disposed of properly with normal construction debris or household waste. For more information regarding technical data of Trex Fencing, including Trex’s fire rating, visit our Technical Resources.

How do I make scratches and scuff marks on my Trex fence less visible?

During shipping, installation, or even after the fence is up, scratches and scuff marks can appear any material, including Trex. These typically become much less visible after weathering (which typically takes a season of exposure to sunlight). However, to minimize the appearance of these scratches and scuff marks sooner, using Windex or WD-40 on the affected areas. This will darken the material and will lighten with the rest of the fence as it weathers. Spray a small amount of Windex or WD-40 on a rag and lightly rub into the affected area sufficiently to darken the material. Do not use too much of the spray or it will leave a noticeable spot on your fence until it weathers off.

Note: It is best to test these methods on a scrap piece or a small, less noticeable area of your fence first to make sure you get the desired results. 

How do you stop a fence from warping?

Choosing the right material and installing it properly will help stop a fence from warping. Poor quality materials such as wood that has not been dried prior to installation can cause boards to warp. Some fences, like the Trex fence systems, have been engineered to help them avoid warping. In the case of Trex, the pickets have curved edges which allow them to keep greater rigidity in their shape. Additionally, they interlock when they are installed thereby forcing the pickets to remain true.

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Will bleach hurt composite fencing?

Use of products containing bleach or oxalic/phosphoric acid will more than likely lighten the surface of composite fencing. Use the product in an inconspicuous area to determine if the effect achieves the results you want. Keep in mind, though, that in many cases, using bleach to clean your composite fence is not necessary. Hot soapy water and a soft bristle brush can oftentimes do the trick just fine. Since bleach is corrosive, it’s best to use alternative cleaners per the composite fence’s recommendations typically found on their web site. In regard to Trex Fencing, consult our Trex Fencing Care & Cleaning Guide for more information concerning different cleaning recommendations.

What color are the screws that come with the Seclusions fence system?

The fasteners used for the Seclusions fence kits are a green-colored #2 square head, #7 1-5/8″ epoxy-coated exterior screw. All fence kits include these fasteners. The placement of the Seclusions screws makes them virtually invisible to the casual observer.

There are 24 total screws used per 6-8′ tall section:

  • 4 brackets x 4 screws per bracket
  • 2 pickets attached to posts x 3 screws per picket
  • 1 top rail x 2 screws through the rail into the top bracket

How do I use finish nails for my Trex fence?

The fastest way to apply finish nails to your Trex fence is with a finish nail gun. Finish nails are used to help secure pickets to the top and bottom rail and to attach the post caps to the posts. If you have a compressor, there are finish nail guns that can be attached to a hose to use the gun. Battery-operated guns like Dewalt, Ridgid, Hitachi or Ryobi are more versatile but are typically a bit more expensive. The best nails to use are 1-1/4″ to 1-1/2″, 16 gauge, straight brad nails (which have a very small head thereby making them virtually invisible when they are applied). Before you begin, set the pressure on your gun so the nail head sinks just slightly inside the rails. This helps to hide them without overshooting. An alternative to a finish nail is a trim head composite screw. Either one will help to complete your fence.

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Pages 12 and 13 of our installation guide offers additional instructions. Additionally, our Installation Resources include videos that visually show where and how finish nails can be applied.

How do you get graffiti off of Trex Fencing?

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Graffiti is a nuisance for any surface and, unfortunately, Trex isn’t immune to it either. Graffiti will adhere to masonry, wood, vinyl, and virtually any surface. Taggers typically choose paint that is permanent so it can be exceptionally hard to remove. However, here are some suggestions to help you remove graffiti or adapt fences that have been tagged.
If the graffiti is relatively fresh, you can often remove it with a third-party cleanser, a soft bristle brush and low pressure washer. Inquire at your local hardware store to see what products they may have in stock.
Once graffiti dries, it is virtually impossible to get off of any surface, even vinyl, masonry, or steel, through a normal cleaning. If you get most of the paint out, it will probably still leave a shadow of chemical residue on any surface. However, there are ways to deal with it that will help reduce the problem for paint that has dried and set. Third party products such as Goof Off and World’s Best Graffiti Removal are tougher cleansers that are specifically made to break down paint.
If you don’t notice the graffiti tagging for several days and it bakes in with the heat and sun, a third-party cleanser might not be able to sufficiently remove the graffiti paint. Although it’s not optimal from a maintenance standpoint, you do have the option of painting your Trex Fence. To color match, temporarily remove a picket or use a piece of scrap and take it to your local paint supplier so they can help you mix a color that works.

Please note that we do not endorse any particular product and we highly recommend you test any products you select on a small section of the fence prior to applying it to the entire structure. Cleansers typically do not have any negative impact on the material itself, but could lighten the pigment within Trex. Color variation is not covered under the warranty so no claims can be made for the effects of graffiti or pigment discoloration due to use of third-party cleansers. DO NOT USE A POWER WASHER. Anything more than a low pressure wash could damage the surface of the fence and void the warranty. 

Looking for general guidance on cleaning other substances off your fence? Visit our Fence Care Guide for a variety of maintenance situations.

What color are the screws that come with the Horizons fence system?

The fasteners used for the Horizons fence kits are a #10 3/4″, #2 Phillips pan-head screw black oxide coated with a sealant. All fence kits include these fasteners. There are 54 total screws used per 6′ tall section. The placement of the Horizons screws makes them visible primarily on one side of the fence.

How do you clean a composite fence?

In general, a composite fence is very low maintenance and easy to clean. This is one of the biggest virtues of composite fencing. Typical cleaning of a dirty Trex fence, for example, usually only requires using a bucket of soapy water, a soft bristle brush, and a hose. The dirt usually comes off easily and the fence looks fantastic after the cleaning. Some foreign materials such as graffiti or sap may take more effort to clean. Importantly, we do not recommend pressure washing the fence as that will likely damage the fence. Consult the Trex Fencing Care and Cleaning guide for more advice on cleaning a dirty Trex fence.

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How do I fill a hole in my Trex fence post?

If you have a small hole in your Trex fence post (or any component for that matter), create a plug with discarded composite material.

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There are a variety of ways to do this. If you don’t have tools to plunge route plugs, you can use small pieces of discarded material to fill the hole. An easy method is to use the sawdust created after cutting Trex materials, compress it with your fingers, and put the material into the hole.